Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

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Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

Postby runs » 2019-03-17 09:40

I want to change my PC (motherboard, CPU and memory) this upcoming summer.


I would like to keep my SD disk with the Debian installed, wifi card, also the nvidia graphic card.


Have I to reinstall all the system? Or simply replace the disk and voila it works!
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Re: Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

Postby Head_on_a_Stick » 2019-03-17 10:14

If you have a UEFI system then you may have to create new NVRAM boot entries in the motherboard and if the CPU is from a different manufacturer then you should install the correct microcode to ensure stability.

Depending on the PCI slots you may also have to reconfigure your wireless connection if the interface name is changed:

https://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Softwa ... faceNames/

Otherwise I think you'll be OK, I can swap hard drives from one machine to another and boot the system fine (non-UEFI, Intel CPUs).
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Re: Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

Postby CwF » 2019-03-17 10:38

runs wrote:Or simply replace the disk and voila it works!


Most likely, yes.

There are specifics to consider before hand, and plug-n-play is not really a good way to look at it.

It can be a benefit that things don't always fully configure, since that can lead to dependences of assumption.

So adjust your thinking and realize that if it boots to a command line it is technically a success, since a configuration can be so specialized it can't boot correctly. When a configuration is generalized, or default, it may come up unchanged.

Debian does 'Enumerate' on each boot, but does much less automagical configuration than the term plug and play infers.

Xorg configs if present will hang you up at the command line until you redo it. Network names may change. And any other detail specific to one machine and not the other will need an edit, Debian will not redo the edits for you, but it will know what it's looking at.

I've recently, and am still in the middle of passing my personal 'distro' around to test this very subject with buster. Both amd64 and i386 have jumped computers perfectly. Born, installed, created in a kvm virtual machine, then imaged to disk and installed in the various machines, and sometimes the host that hosted the vm. 5+ different boards and cpu combo's and a dozen video cards, and no real issues. Note I take the idea once step further and can customize the "install" while only a disk image by mounting it and adjusting what's needed when I know the details. It's just as easy to adjust things after the first boot.

I'm stubborn, so I've wasted days fixing things when a fresh install would have taken 20 minutes. Now I can fix it in 15 minutes, assuming something missed to begin with. I've installed Debian 4 times during jessie, each a flavor, all are still alive, and no longer Jessie's. I don't intend to install again any time soon, if ever. I'll get to testing the i386 on actual high end 32bit stuff in a few weeks, that could be interesting.
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Re: Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

Postby Wheelerof4te » 2019-03-17 19:01

In these cases, I would always do the full backup and reinstall the OS. That is the most assuerd way of knowing you'll have a working system.
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Re: Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

Postby runs » 2019-03-19 09:42

Ok, I'll put here the result. :-)

(crossed fingers)
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Re: Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

Postby sunrat » 2019-03-19 11:28

Do a full backup anyway. You never realise how much you need it until you need it.
“ computer users can be divided into 2 categories:
Those who have lost data
...and those who have not lost data YET ”
Remember to BACKUP!
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Re: Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

Postby reinob » 2019-03-26 12:51

liza123 wrote:Hello,
I am new to the thread and want to ask you a question.

Is it possible to install Debian on my 16 GB SD Card ? Do I just during installation process chose my SD Card partition and install it (that doesn't work if we have USB) or do I need to install persistence ISO on my SD Card?


You can install debian on anything that can boot. The Raspberry Pi usually boots debian off an SD card. My NAS boots debian off a USB stick.

As long as your boot loader (GRUB, U-Boot, etc.) can work with it, Linux (and Debian) will be fine with it.
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Re: Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

Postby CwF » 2019-03-27 14:07

I'm somewhat amazed at the skepticism of debians ability here. Most of you would expect a live cd/dvd/usb to boot on most things, why not an 'installed' system? Maybe compare the two types, similar and very different. The live system has much more configuration data, some extra routines, and a somewhat different structure, but much of that fat can be built into a installed and persistent 'living' image.

Other than my ssd fail I posted on yesterday, I just got through testing many things over the last weeks of which this question of ability is an assumption and not the actual test. I mentioned some gotchas above but otherwise here it is.

I test with three images, an amd64 image with qemu-kvm in a luks lvm structure, a amd64 unified single partition, and a i386 unified single partition. All three jump between multiple computers without issue, different video cards and all. The exact point is looking at things from a perspective of the OS as a control and not a variable. I'm telling you it works...

So when any of you try it and something doesn't work, you found something to fix, or consider, and NOT the reason why not to do it!

Bios types matter, and my i386 did blow up on a E5 Xeon. But, i386, seriously!?. That has the current wine and the focus is two parts, memory usage and video cards. I had favored nvidea, no longer. AMD scored big, intel is better than I thought. And i386 does indeed do more on less memory, even when it has multiple sockets and gigs of ram. The amd64's worked in all test.
I'm at the point with this that I wouldn't consider installing a fresh system if the destination is a simple setup. The max simple setup in the luks lvm hypervisor, not that simple, and yet it jumps computers fine. When in question I have images of both architectures that were frozen at a cli state with no DE at all but with a functional startx xorg with xterm, wicd networking, all non free firmwares for wifi, bluetooth, video, and others, ready to customize. Kinda like a debasaurus egg, raise it friendly how you like it.

Anyway, this cycle is about done for me. The hypervisor is on hold at current stretch, the other images are current buster, and I haven't 'installed' debian since Jessie. I'll report back if Bullseye fails the momentum in March 2021.
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Re: Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

Postby runs » 2019-04-15 12:02

Tomorrow is the D-DAY.


I'm crossing fingers.


:shock: :o
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Re: Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

Postby runs » 2019-04-16 15:33

Done. It works all OK!!!



I only had to change the network name.


:D
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Re: Is it Debian a plug & play OS?

Postby CwF » 2019-04-16 16:02

Congratulations!
I had faith!
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