Stretch vs Buster

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Stretch vs Buster

Postby sdibaja » 2018-03-13 14:03

I was thinking Buster had all of the very same Stretch stuff, but with the "new" versions.
Maybe this is a unique item: alarm-clock-applet
a friend is running Buster, and it is Not in the repos.
After enabling Stretch it was found and installed.
So, is there a downside (other than this case) to having Stretch and Buster enabled on a daily basis?
thanks, Peter
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Re: Stretch vs Buster

Postby None1975 » 2018-03-13 14:28

sdibaja wrote:So, is there a downside (other than this case) to having Stretch and Buster enabled on a daily basis?

Don't make a FrankenDebian. According Debian Wiki
Debian Stable should not be combined with other releases. If you're trying to install software that isn't available in the current Debian Stable release, it's not a good idea to add repositories for other Debian releases. The problems might not happen right away, but the next time you install updates.The reason things can break is because the software packaged for one Debian release is built to be compatible with the rest of the software for that release. For example, installing packages from buster on a stretch system could also install newer versions of core libraries including libc6. This results in a system that is not testing or stable but a broken mix of the two.

So, don't brake Debian.
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Debian Wiki | DontBreakDebian, My config files in github
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Re: Stretch vs Buster

Postby dcihon » 2018-03-13 14:42

According to this bug report its libraries need update to GTK3:
https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=885807
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Re: Stretch vs Buster

Postby Wheelerof4te » 2018-03-13 14:45

Many packages are dropped during the life of next-stable release. What that means, some programs won't be available for one reason or the other when new major version gets out. Most of the time, dropped package is depricieted.
On the contrary, some packages get introduced during next-stable testing time and aren't available on current Stable.

What you can do about it, is install flatpak and run new applications as flatpaks. This bypasses your entire OS by using runtimes instead of system libraries in order to run said applications.
Downside of that way is more used up disk space, but we have it plenty now.
So my answer is: Stretch with backports and flatpaks for the most of your programs.
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Re: Stretch vs Buster

Postby sdibaja » 2018-03-13 15:01

thanks all for furthering my education.
I did not think to check the bug reports, my bad

personally I use Stretch with backports on my production machines.
but it is fun to play with Buster and Sid, just to see what new and weird come up.

My best, Peter
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Re: Stretch vs Buster

Postby WeLoveDebian » 2018-03-13 16:31

How long does it take for Stable to get backports like mesa, kernels, and such?
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Re: Stretch vs Buster

Postby Wheelerof4te » 2018-03-13 16:47

Mesa doesn't get backported often for stability reasons, kernels do. Mesa can be backported after extensive testing (see Jessie example). Kernel is backported from testing, so some time after it gets in testing.
You can read about backports on Debian wiki:
https://wiki.debian.org/Backports
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