xorg.conf in /etc/X11

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xorg.conf in /etc/X11

Postby oui » 2020-10-31 21:56

Hi

What did happen with (the use f) that file as i did be declared obsolete (in the most distributions, but not all! Some not big brother ones continue to use her xorg.conf)?

I suppose it was possible at that time to read explanation which settings of xorg.conf have to be found at which other place in the future, also now :?:

Continues such a document to be existing?

I am searching for the ACTUAL system file containing the old settings for input units like graphic tablet, mouse and keyboards especially keyboard layout, variant and options.
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Re: xorg.conf in /etc/X11

Postby Head_on_a_Stick » 2020-11-01 12:32

oui wrote:What did happen with (the use f) that file as i did be declared obsolete (in the most distributions

A file placed at /etc/X11/xorg.conf will still be read by X. See xorg.conf(5) for a full list of acceptable locations.

oui wrote:I am searching for the ACTUAL system file containing the old settings for input units like graphic tablet, mouse and keyboards especially keyboard layout, variant and options.

Try
Code: Select all
# Xorg :0 -configure

^ That will generate a skeleton file at /root/xorg.conf.new that you can copy over and edit.
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Re: xorg.conf in /etc/X11

Postby allnikol » 2020-11-05 00:23

...especially keyboard layout, variant and options

If what you're mainly looking for is keyboard setup, you may find https://wiki.debian.org/Keyboard helpful. It addresses both the tools in place to help with changing your keyboard configuration and the config file where that information is written.

As for the information that used to go in xorg.conf, most of that simply isn't stored any more. Between advances in hardware and advances in the kernel, autodetection mostly just works nowadays, and the OS queries the hardware at runtime to find out what its capabilities are, so there's no need to keep a static record of those capabilities in a file on disk. As @Head_on_a_Stick has pointed out, you can still generate and use an xorg.conf file, but it's generally not needed (and not recommended) unless you have an unusual setup that the autodetection doesn't handle well.
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