Tips from our Members

Share your own howto's etc. Not for support questions!

Re: Tips from our Members

Postby secipolla » 2010-08-30 22:34

Looks very similar to volwheel.
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby bmc5311 » 2010-08-30 22:52

it's better - i tried volwheel before i settled on kmix.
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby MeanDean » 2010-08-31 00:35

ehhh....I just stick a shortcut to my favorite mixer on my panel
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby dbbolton » 2010-08-31 01:27

MeanDean wrote:ehhh....I just stick a shortcut to my favorite mixer on my panel

The nerve.
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby bmc5311 » 2010-08-31 11:37

MeanDean wrote:ehhh....I just stick a shortcut to my favorite mixer on my panel


excellent idea, however can't do that with tint2. and i kinda dig using the scroll wheel.. :)
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby MeanDean » 2010-08-31 11:45

bmc5311 wrote:excellent idea, however can't do that with tint2. and i kinda dig using the scroll wheel.. :)

so why are you using tint2? :wink:

okay...so...
a menu shortcut to your favorite mixer
a keyboard shortcut to your favorite mixer
a keyboard shortcut to raise the volume 5% along with a keyboard shortcut to lower the volume 5%
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby bmc5311 » 2010-08-31 11:59

MeanDean wrote:
bmc5311 wrote:excellent idea, however can't do that with tint2. and i kinda dig using the scroll wheel.. :)

so why are you using tint2? :wink:

okay...so...
a menu shortcut to your favorite mixer
a keyboard shortcut to your favorite mixer
a keyboard shortcut to raise the volume 5% along with a keyboard shortcut to lower the volume 5%



tint2 seems to work best (two monitors and i only want a panel on one of them) for me
- fbpanel and every other one i tried except gnome panel (and i've been slowly but surly de-gnomeifing my system) want to stretch across both monitors
already have a menu shortcut, but can't one click mute or use the scroll
did the shortcut key too - ummm, can't remember what i set it to, or pretty much any other shortcut i set up... :lol: they say memory is the 2nd thing to go....

do you use openbox?
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby MeanDean » 2010-08-31 12:14

nah...why use openbox when icewm does so much more and uses less memory :wink:

although I often find myself using e17...it has a volume panel gadget


edit - oops....didnt notice what section/thread I was in....excuse the chit-chat
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby AMLJ » 2010-09-05 01:01

Oh, another tip: :mrgreen:

I'm tired of seeing our experienced users use apt-get, and noobs will also learn from them and that's not good.
Use aptitude!!! 8)
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby Absent Minded » 2010-09-05 03:13

AMLJ wrote:Oh, another tip: :mrgreen:

I'm tired of seeing our experienced users use apt-get, and noobs will also learn from them and that's not good.
Use aptitude!!! 8)


While Debian it's self recomends aptitude because of it's ability to handle dependancies better. Both tools have their uses and are good tools. There is nothing wrong with one using apt-get as long as they are aware of it's abilities and limatations. The same can be said of using Synaptic (I believe a GUI front end to apt-get).
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby craigevil » 2010-09-05 04:07

AMLJ wrote:Oh, another tip: :mrgreen:

I'm tired of seeing our experienced users use apt-get, and noobs will also learn from them and that's not good.
Use aptitude!!! 8)



apt-get forever!!!

There is absolutely no reason to not use apt-get. There is a ton of Debian documentation that refers to apt-get. For example:
The Debian GNU/Linux FAQ - Basics of the Debian package management system
http://www.debian.org/doc/FAQ/ch-pkg_basics.en.html

7.13 How do I install a source package?

Debian source packages can't actually be "installed", they are just unpacked in whatever directory you want to build the binary packages they produce.

Source packages are distributed on most of the same mirrors where you can obtain the binary packages. If you set up your APT's sources.list(5) to include the appropriate "deb-src" lines, you'll be able to easily download any source packages by running

apt-get source foo

To help you in actually building the source package, Debian source package provide the so-called build-dependencies mechanism. This means that the source package maintainer keeps a list of other packages that are required to build their package. To see how this is useful, run

apt-get build-dep foo

before building the source.
7.14 How do I build binary packages from a source package?

The preferred way to do this is by using various wrapper tools. We'll show how it's done using the devscripts tools. Install this package if you haven't done so already.

Now, first get the source package:

apt-get source foo

and change to the source tree:

cd foo-*

Then install needed build-dependencies (if any):

sudo apt-get build-dep foo


The Debian GNU/Linux FAQ - The Debian package management tools
http://www.debian.org/doc/FAQ/ch-pkgtools.en.html
8.1.2 APT

APT is the Advanced Package Tool and provides the apt-get program. apt-get provides a simple way to retrieve and install packages from multiple sources using the command line. Unlike dpkg, apt-get does not understand .deb files, it works with the packages proper name and can only install .deb archives from a source specified in /etc/apt/sources.list. apt-get will call dpkg directly after downloading the .deb archives[5] from the configured sources.

Some common ways to use apt-get are: *

To update the list of package known by your system, you can run:

apt-get update

(you should execute this regularly to update your package lists)
*

To upgrade all the packages on your system (without installing extra packages or removing packages), run:

apt-get upgrade
*

To install the foo package and all its dependencies, run:

apt-get install foo
*

To remove the foo package from your system, run:

apt-get remove foo
*

To remove the foo package and its configuration files from your system, run:

apt-get --purge remove foo
*

To upgrade all the packages on your system, and, if needed for a package upgrade, installing extra packages or removing packages, run:

apt-get dist-upgrade

(The command upgrade keeps a package at its installed obsolete version if upgrading would need an extra package to be installed, for a new dependency to be satisfied. The dist-upgrade command is less conservative.)

Note that you must be logged in as root to perform any commands that modify the system packages.

Note that apt-get now installs recommended packages as default and is the preferred program for package management from console to perform system installation and major system upgrades for its robustness.

The apt tool suite also includes the apt-cache tool to query the package lists. You can use it to find packages providing specific functionality through simple text or regular expression queries and through queries of dependencies in the package management system. Some common ways to use apt-cache are:

To find packages whose description contain word:

apt-cache search word *

To print the detailed information of a package:

apt-cache show package *

To print the packages a given package depends on:

apt-cache depends package *

To print detailed information of the versions available for a package and the packages that reverse-depends on it:

apt-cache showpkg package

For more information, install the apt package and read apt-get(8), sources.list(5) and install the apt-doc package and read /usr/share/doc/apt-doc/guide.html/index.html.
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby MeanDean » 2010-09-05 04:16

forget them both....use wajig
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby AMLJ » 2010-09-05 07:59

Aptitude is a more powerful front-end to apt-get, that's why I recommend using it...


--aptitude offers easy access to all versions of a package.

--aptitude makes it easy to keep track of obsolete software by listing it under "Obsolete and Locally Created Packages".

--
aptitude includes a fairly powerful system for searching particular packages and limiting the package display. Users familiar with mutt will pick up quickly, as mutt was the inspiration for the expression syntax.

--aptitude can be used to install the predefined tasks available.

--
aptitude in full screen mode has su functionality embedded and can be run by a normal user. It will call su (and ask for the root password, if any) when you really need administrative privileges.



MeanDean wrote:forget them both....use wajig

Could you please tell me the advantages. I guess I didn't see it in the documentation I read sometime ago, about Debian package management. Maybe I just missed that part.
Thanks in advance.
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby bmc5311 » 2010-09-05 12:35

potayto - potahto
tomayto - tomahto
6 of one and a half dozen of the other.
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Re: Tips from our Members

Postby Lou » 2010-09-05 12:37

Devuan Jessie - IceWM - vimperator - no DM
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