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Is the debian testing cycle unnecessarily long?

PostPosted: 2017-06-17 09:13
by prahladyeri
As against a "semi-stable" system such as Ubuntu or Linux Mint that provides the right mix of stability and latest features, what does one achieve by running an absolutely stable (but consisting of old packages) system like debian?

Considering that both Mint and Ubuntu are far more popular than debian (though they are both derivatives of debian itself), don't you think that the debian testing cycle of 2 years is far longer than necessary? Is it a good idea to reduce that time a bit to compensate for more latest features? Or alternatively, create a separate LTS branch which makes more sense for servers, and let the main branch consist of shorter cycle for desktop based PCs and laptops? I believe this is the approach that Ubuntu follows.

Re: Is the debian testing cycle unnecessarily long?

PostPosted: 2017-06-17 09:26
by kopper
What about unstable or testing? If you consider stable as LTS release, I think you have answered your own question.

EDIT: Running 'absolutely' stable has it's use cases. SInce many production systems do not need latest features (except for security updates), 2 year release cycle may be even too fast in certain environments. If it works, don't touch it. :P

Re: Is the debian testing cycle unnecessarily long?

PostPosted: 2017-06-17 09:27
by dilberts_left_nut
No.

Re: Is the debian testing cycle unnecessarily long?

PostPosted: 2017-06-17 09:30
by arochester
create a separate LTS branch


https://wiki.debian.org/LTS

Re: Is the debian testing cycle unnecessarily long?

PostPosted: 2017-06-17 09:36
by phenest
How many threads you gonna open about this?
http://forums.debian.net/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=133459

Re: Is the debian testing cycle unnecessarily long?

PostPosted: 2017-06-17 09:45
by prahladyeri
kopper wrote:What about unstable or testing?


I'm considering that since a very long time, but don't know how tough handling a testing machine is going to be, considering that I'm not a seasoned linux pro and just a regular user. I know a bit of python programming and basic stuff like apt-get, bash, starting/stopping systemctl services, etc. But if something breaks at the kernel level after a testing update, what am I going to do? The usual advice you get here is not to use testing as a regular distribution, only do it if you are doing it for actual testing, or you are a seasoned linux pro.

Re: Is the debian testing cycle unnecessarily long?

PostPosted: 2017-06-17 09:49
by prahladyeri
phenest wrote:How many threads you gonna open about this?
http://forums.debian.net/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=133459


My apologies, but that question about freezing was just a part of my thought process, I hadn't actually formulated my question yet. Should I delete that question?

Re: Is the debian testing cycle unnecessarily long?

PostPosted: 2017-06-17 15:33
by dasein
prahladyeri wrote:Should I delete that question?

What you "should" do is crawl back under your bridge.

AFAICT, any time you get bored, you come here and post some variant of this "question." You've done it for years now.

Depending on your mood when you create each thread, sometimes you claim to be "new," other times you claim to be a "power user." But you never give any indication of paying any attention at all to the responses you receive.

Since you are so fond of Ubuntu, what you "should" do is go troll their forums. Explain to them that their release cycle is nonsensically short and "ask" why they don't adopt Debian's superior release model. See how far it gets you.

ImageDon't feed the troll

Obligatory time-saver link