Employability...

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Employability...

Postby evandenbroecke » 2017-02-14 14:02

Might be an interesting topic, dunno if its been discussed lately...

Anyone got any tips on how to increase your 'employability' as a Linux/Debian user?
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Re: Employability...

Postby srq2625 » 2017-02-14 15:48

Employability is all about what sets one apart from others in the workforce marketplace; what tool or tools does one have in their toolbox that is different and/or better than those of another.

The fact that one has experience using Linux/Debian is really not all that unique. Familiarity with computers and office oriented software is now almost an "Well, of course you have that experience."

I would, however, suspect Linux administration experience and certification would enhance one's employability.
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Re: Employability...

Postby evandenbroecke » 2017-02-14 16:24

Good points... Although I would suspect some ability to program and script might be a bit of an advantage. Linux has always easy access to resources for such things...
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Re: Employability...

Postby pendrachken » 2017-02-14 19:18

As srq2625 said administering experience is a must. Either on the job, or at the very least certifications. This of course means knowing at least bash scripting, if not a bit of python and perl. Knowing how to debug a C compile failure can help in most situations as well.

Knowing basic troubleshooting and how to search for command / issue resolving is also a must.

Also be prepared to be bored out of your skull - every day will have a different problem that all boil down to the same basic issues, and require the same methodical troubleshooting. This is the reason I got out of IT after 15 years, and went into the hard sciences where at least I can decide the way my research will be going... at least more than working in a data center somewhere watching the same build fail for the same reason as the last 100 times the devs tried to change this one little thing </rant>.
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Re: Employability...

Postby srq2625 » 2017-02-15 10:33

evandenbroecke wrote:Good points... Although I would suspect some ability to program and script might be a bit of an advantage. Linux has always easy access to resources for such things...

In some work environments (particularly in the U.S. Gov't and DoD), attempting to program/script when not on the IT/Admin staff can get one in a tight spot. With the increased threat of host intrusion, malware, etc - most IT departments, where they actually deploy Linux, have it really locked down. The U.S. civilian sector may be a bit more open to such things though.
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Re: Employability...

Postby evandenbroecke » 2017-02-16 14:05

Hum... Seems stupid to me... I mean it's just a language...

Anyways, I have been working with linux, well, a long time now. I heard about it when I was in school in 1997, and probably my first exposure to it. I picked it up in early 2000's and I have been using it as my primary OS for years now. I attempted a small web hosting start up which later failed, but I did learn an a lot.

I guess what I am really saying is well I have been using linux for a very long time now, which inherently, learned quite a bit about this collection of amazing software we call Linux. I love it so much I am interested in making a career out of it if I can. So I just really want to hear what others have done in the past or what they are doing now, either already in the field or anything they have done in the past. Brag a little I dont care...

:D
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Re: Employability...

Postby kedaha » 2017-02-18 10:12

Just a few thoughts:
Consider being a freelancer; this way you're your own boss.
As for employability, I think the first step is to define what services you can offer; just experience using Debian is not enough. For example, if you have a server, you could start with something like setting up websites for customers complete with domain, wordpress or drupal7 and email but you must know exactly how to do it, in my view, by using only Debian's stable main repository. And make sure you know everything about backing up your databases. Don't try and take on too much. Try things out before putting them into practice. Follow the principle: "Do One Thing and Do It Well." Above all learn systems administration.
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Re: Employability...

Postby Thorny » 2017-02-18 12:55

Some thoughts on employability:

Kedaha has given you some sane thoughts in my opinion. Of course on one point, freelancing isn't what everybody wants to do or is comfortable with. If you are really good and can keep the contracts coming in then I agree, that might be the most satisfying. This might actually be the fastest route to being the "sys admin" who just sits monitoring servers, having the time to browse forums and only having to work when something "goes down", if that is your goal. Going to depend somewhat on your income requirements and ability to "sell" your skills. Might also matter how much time you want to work, having your own business means bookkeeping and taxes and all that stuff too, usually done on your own time without anyone else paying for it.

From your experience, you may already be familiar with many of the topics in the Debian Administrators Handbook, make sure you are familiar with them all.
https://debian-handbook.info/

Practice your skills in this forum and others. Answering posts in forums gives you experience with users that have all sorts of skill levels and intelligence levels and personalities and that is what you are likely to encounter in IT, especially while you are in entry level positions. Sometimes, you may even know more than your supervisor.

As both srq2625 and pendrachken mentioned, "certification" is something that can help you get "in the door", it looks good to the Human Resources Department who often aren't really technically knowledgeable enough to assess whatever experience you've had. However, once in, your knowledge and the ability to solve real world troubles for average or even sometimes "stupid" users is something that could help you progress. Understanding people is a useful skill, it isn't going to matter much (at least at first) how good you are technically if after you've helped people they complain to the supervisor about "you".

These days, I doubt that you'd be offered a "programming" job without secondary education and a degree in Computer Science. But yes, scripting and the ability to understand scripts would be useful knowledge at whatever level you work.

Judging by your comment about school, you are a bit older than people usually hired for entry level positions and that might be a factor. I even hesitated to answer because you likely already know much of what I wrote. In interviews, be ready to detail how your life experience and maturity will help you in the job.

Why would anyone want to post here to brag about what they have done, this is not social media? I apologise if, as you stated, that is what you really want.
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Re: Employability...

Postby evandenbroecke » 2017-02-18 14:47

No, Thanks for the information its all good. I might, as you say know some of it, but some of it is kind of new, at least a new way to think about the subject. And yet some we just need to be reminded of. Yeah I know this aint social media, but I am just trying to start a conversation. Often a lot is learn in what seems unimportant at the time.

Thanks for replying!

Todd
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Re: Employability...

Postby Andersson85 » 2017-02-20 14:06

kedaha wrote:Just a few thoughts:
Consider being a freelancer; this way you're your own boss.


Being freelancer isn't that easy as it sounds. I mean - for some people. I always thought that freelance job is dream come true, but to be honest... Its not good for people that are not very good at self-motivating and for people that actually likes to open their mouth to someone else couple of times every day.
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