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Arch, Slackware, Gentoo, Funtoo, Jobs and Employers

PostPosted: 2018-07-10 01:22
by Noob_Command_Line
What is the opinion of employers about Arch, Slackware, Gentoo and Funtoo?


There is reason for to learn use Arch, Slackware, Gentoo and Funtoo if you intent is to find job?

If not, why?

If there is not reason for to learn use Arch, Slackware, Gentoo and Funtoo to find job, why use Arch, Slackware, Gentoo and Funtoo?

Re: Arch, Slackware, Gentoo, Funtoo, Jobs and Employers

PostPosted: 2018-07-10 02:12
by cds60601
Basing my answer on my own enterprise work experience, Redhat/Fedora/CentOS are probably the top ones to have in your arsenal of Linux experiences.
After that, I might venture to say Ubuntu would be the next since I think (don't hold me to that) they are involved with Amazon cloud maybe.

Again, the first three I mentioned would be in the enterprise. Smaller companies, probably not so much.

Cheers
Chris

Re: Arch, Slackware, Gentoo, Funtoo, Jobs and Employers

PostPosted: 2018-07-10 06:07
by Wheelerof4te
Noob_Command_Line wrote:What is the opinion of employers about Arch, Slackware, Gentoo and Funtoo?

You will have to ask them on your next job interview :D
Noob_Command_Line wrote:There is reason for to learn use Arch, Slackware, Gentoo and Funtoo if you intent is to find job?

Probably not now, but it was useful back in the day, from what I have read. These days, most jobs will require you to know your way around systemd and the modern GNU/Linux infrastructure. So, it's Red Hat/CentOS, Ubuntu and Debian.
Noob_Command_Line wrote:If not, why?

People got tired of doing things manually, so they found a way to automate most things. It's the same as in any other industry. How good/bad this is, it's the subject for another topic.
Noob_Command_Line wrote:If there is not reason for to learn use Arch, Slackware, Gentoo and Funtoo to find job, why use Arch, Slackware, Gentoo and Funtoo?

Lots of people like to use Arch and it's derivatives on their desktops, since it's rolling-release distro. Slackware is used for it's simplicity and transparency by a still loyal user base. Gentoo fills a niche use-case in building customized systems (like ChromeOS).

Re: Arch, Slackware, Gentoo, Funtoo, Jobs and Employers

PostPosted: 2018-07-11 04:26
by Noob_Command_Line
Wheelerof4te wrote:
Noob_Command_Line wrote:What is the opinion of employers about Arch, Slackware, Gentoo and Funtoo?

You will have to ask them on your next job interview :D
Noob_Command_Line wrote:There is reason for to learn use Arch, Slackware, Gentoo and Funtoo if you intent is to find job?

Probably not now, but it was useful back in the day, from what I have read. These days, most jobs will require you to know your way around systemd and the modern GNU/Linux infrastructure. So, it's Red Hat/CentOS, Ubuntu and Debian.
Noob_Command_Line wrote:If not, why?

People got tired of doing things manually, so they found a way to automate most things. It's the same as in any other industry. How good/bad this is, it's the subject for another topic.


@Wheelerof4te,

How good/bad this is?

Re: Arch, Slackware, Gentoo, Funtoo, Jobs and Employers

PostPosted: 2018-07-11 20:33
by HuangLao
Depends on where the job is located and what task etc...?
In the USA and some parts of Asia: Red Hat, Fedora, CentOS, Ubuntu, Debian
In Europe, Asia and some parts of US: SUSE/openSUSE, Ubuntu, Debian

Keep in mind that most servers/critical infrastructure that run Linux still use SysV and have no plans on switching to systemd any time soon, so knowledge of SysV and real Unix/Linux is still very important. Most satellites still run SysV and BSD inits as an example. Can you imagine a one and half minute hang time for those things?

Personally, I would suggest learning Slackware, FreeBSD, CentOS, Fedora, openSUSE and Debian in no particular order, that would cover almost any possible use case and employer demand. Also, learn how to break systems repeatedly and be able to fix them without reinstalling the OS, as that often is not an option in a job.

Time for you to fire up those virtual machines.