Ubuntu Upgraders: "Feisty Flake"

If it doesn't relate to Debian, but you still want to share it, please do it here

Postby DeanLinkous » 2007-04-20 23:23

I think the terminal should be made to look like a forum post window or a email window - then nobody would be so scared of it. :D
User avatar
DeanLinkous
 
Posts: 1611
Joined: 2006-06-04 15:28

Postby Jackiebrown » 2007-04-21 00:57

Pobega wrote:it offers some choice; Gusty Gibbon (7.10) will have two versions, one with proprietary drivers and one without.


Am I the only one who thinks that this is just going to be done once so that they can say that their users clearly prefer the proprietary one to end the argument on their forums once and for all?

(No, I am not paranoid when it comes to Ubuntu :wink: )
User avatar
Jackiebrown
 
Posts: 1276
Joined: 2007-01-02 04:46
Location: San Antonio, TX

Postby DeanLinkous » 2007-04-21 01:07

Jackiebrown wrote:
Pobega wrote:it offers some choice; Gusty Gibbon (7.10) will have two versions, one with proprietary drivers and one without.


Am I the only one who thinks that this is just going to be done once so that they can say that their users clearly prefer the proprietary one to end the argument on their forums once and for all?

(No, I am not paranoid when it comes to Ubuntu :wink: )

Excellent point! I personally doubt it - but it would not surprise me at all either. IMO there is no reason to go that route, it seems contrary to me and nobody IMO that objects to what goes on in one flavor would bother with using the free flavor.
User avatar
DeanLinkous
 
Posts: 1611
Joined: 2006-06-04 15:28

Postby rickh » 2007-04-21 02:01

It won't end the debate. Too many of their top developers are from Debian. All it does it buy them time to get developers with lower standards up to speed.
Debian-Lenny/Sid 32/64
Desktop: Generic Core 2 Duo, EVGA 680i, Nvidia
Laptop: Generic Intel SIS/AC97
User avatar
rickh
 
Posts: 3473
Joined: 2006-06-29 02:13
Location: Albuquerque, NM USA

Postby Pobega » 2007-04-21 11:18

Jackiebrown wrote:
Pobega wrote:it offers some choice; Gusty Gibbon (7.10) will have two versions, one with proprietary drivers and one without.


Am I the only one who thinks that this is just going to be done once so that they can say that their users clearly prefer the proprietary one to end the argument on their forums once and for all?

(No, I am not paranoid when it comes to Ubuntu :wink: )


Well the way I see it is that it's better to look on the bright side of things then to think the worst. Of course that's entirely possible, but they have a lot of people who are up in arms about 7.04's proprietary drivers (Including me), I mean they already have loads of different Ubuntu flavors (Which is basically the same OS with a different window manager), why not release a free version too?
Jabber: pobega@gmail.com
Pronunciation: Poh - Bay - Guh
User avatar
Pobega
 
Posts: 870
Joined: 2007-01-04 04:30
Location: New York

Postby AgenT » 2007-04-21 14:42

Sounds like pure marketing. Create a second distribution that is free so that the main and popular distribution can then be jammed packed with all the non-free and propriatary software that will fit into it. And when people start to complain, the marketing folks can say: "but look here, we have a free as in freedom distro!". The "new" distro being just gNewSense with a new name (gNubuntu?).

It just sounds like an excuse to create a fully fledged propriatary distribution, go back and dismiss everything that the distribution stood for and the creator promised (staying true to the debian spirit, staying true to freedom, humanity to others, etc.) and have an "excuse" to do it. But that should not be a surprise from an organization who always championed freedom software yet their only major software being close-source and proprietary (launchpad). Not to mention their anti-Debian behavior.
User avatar
AgenT
 
Posts: 500
Joined: 2007-01-21 01:25

Debian Etch vs Feisty Fawn

Postby jml » 2007-04-21 17:35

Just to add my two cents, I think that the there is a place for both philosophies. In 1999 when I first tried Linux, Redhat and Mandrake were "relatively" easy to install, but their package management applications drove me nuts! Let me tell you RPM hell is real. I had heard that Debian had better package management, but I was never able to get Woody installed. If it were not for distros like Mepis (pre-Ubuntu,) and Libranet, I probably would have given up on Linux. Now I will admit that Etch has made huge advances in ease of installation, maintenance, and use. I run it on my work laptop at home and love it. The stability and speed can't be beat.

But for new users, Linux has a few issues that make the transition from other proprietary OS's difficult: Wireless networking, 3D graphics drivers, multimedia support, proprietary codecs to name a few. In so far as the the "easy to use" distros make new users' transition to Linux a bit less painful, I see that as a good thing. I suspect that many Ubuntu users will gradually migrate to Debian or other distros when the outgrow the need for the hand holding that new users find helpful.

Joe
Never meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and good with catsup.
jml
 
Posts: 217
Joined: 2006-10-26 19:51
Location: Albert Lea, Minnesota

Postby llivv » 2007-04-22 08:54

I think you make a very good point jml. In theory, if it's easy to migrate in steps the path to desktop market share also increases in steps. I see a problem with this theroy, only because of what I have noticed here the last few days. Users come to the forum and make apparently sincere requests for help in their first post. But in their second post they begin to reveal their true nature, going so far as to start bashing debian regarding things they have tried both with debian and with other dists already.These things were obviously not mentioned in their first post for whatever reason. And I believe some actually have been lead to believe that this type of behavior is the way to enlightenment. I guess their are pros and cons to the step by step method of migration as well as the complete change of OS lifestyle approch. but it does create a lot of hostility within the various Linux communities as well as between users of other competing OS's Either way I guess it better than letting a commercial competitor force feed it's own hacked up proprietary version to it's users, and than setting them upon unsuspecting communities.
In memory of Ian Ashley Murdock (1973 - 2015) founder of the Debian project.
User avatar
llivv
 
Posts: 5488
Joined: 2007-02-14 18:10
Location: cold storage

Postby rennen01 » 2007-04-22 14:14

I use Ubuntu 6.10. I am going to wait for all the bugs to get worked out before I upgrade.

As far as the guys saying they got tired of upgrading every 6 months, I have a simple solution: Don't upgrade every 6 months :D
root@debian:~$ apt-get install life
User avatar
rennen01
 
Posts: 14
Joined: 2007-03-24 00:56
Location: San Diego, CA

Postby Burnside » 2007-04-22 16:50

rennen01 wrote:I use Ubuntu 6.10. I am going to wait for all the bugs to get worked out before I upgrade.

As far as the guys saying they got tired of upgrading every 6 months, I have a simple solution: Don't upgrade every 6 months :D


Unless I'm mistaken not upgrading means no more security updates to your packages, right? That's a big deal.
Burnside
 
Posts: 622
Joined: 2006-07-23 20:33
Location: Bend, OR

Postby plb » 2007-04-22 18:26

No, each release is supported for 18 months is it? With the exception of the LTS.
plb
 
Posts: 472
Joined: 2007-04-22 14:24
Location: NYC

Postby jml » 2007-04-22 23:48

plb is right. Standard Ubuntu releases have security updates for 18 months after release. Ubuntu 6.06 LTS distro offers "Long Term Support" Three years for the desktop version, and five years for server version. The only problem a person faces by not upgrading regularly, is Ubuntu is "designed" to do upgrades in order. So if for example you choose to not upgrade to Feisty Fawn, if you decide later to upgrade to the one released after FF, you have to upgrade to Feisty Fawn first, then upgrade to the release you really want. (I have not confirmed this, but I did read about this on the Ubuntu Forum.)

While Etch is my main distro on my home computer, I travel with a 13" laptop that I bought from System 76. In comes with Ubuntu preinstalled, and it comes with all of the hardware configured to work out of the box. My personal impression of Ubuntu 6.10 is generally favorable, but it seems to run just a bit slower than Etch. And, I do what rennen01 does. I wait a week or two before I do a dist-upgrade in Ubuntu, to let the dust settle. Luckily most of my Debian skills apply nicely to Etch.

Joe
Never meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and good with catsup.
jml
 
Posts: 217
Joined: 2006-10-26 19:51
Location: Albert Lea, Minnesota

Postby Pobega » 2007-04-23 00:36

jml, just a suggestion; I'm using a System76 laptop too, and I find Debian suits my needs a lot better. All you need to know is what extra packages to install (915 resolution, and all of the ipw3945-related packages for my wireless) and how to configure everything (Which I assume you know) and you'll be all set.

The one thing I didn't like about System76's driver installer is that it pulled in a lot of non-free packages without warning me first (Run vrms to check!), but otherwise I love the company; No complaints!
Jabber: pobega@gmail.com
Pronunciation: Poh - Bay - Guh
User avatar
Pobega
 
Posts: 870
Joined: 2007-01-04 04:30
Location: New York

Postby jml » 2007-04-23 02:27

Thanks for the great Idea, Pobega! Which laptop are you using? In addition to the graphics and wireless drivers, were you able to get things like memory card readers working? On many levels, I like Debian better than Ubuntu. Once I get my courage built up, I'll take the plunge.
Never meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and good with catsup.
jml
 
Posts: 217
Joined: 2006-10-26 19:51
Location: Albert Lea, Minnesota

Postby Pobega » 2007-04-23 11:09

jml wrote:Thanks for the great Idea, Pobega! Which laptop are you using? In addition to the graphics and wireless drivers, were you able to get things like memory card readers working? On many levels, I like Debian better than Ubuntu. Once I get my courage built up, I'll take the plunge.

I'm using a Pangolin Value, and it works perfectly fine.

3d was no problem because this laptop came with an Intel video card, so I didn't have to bother with the non-free nVidia/ATI drivers (And the Intel ones seemed to work out of the box on Debian, too!).

For the wireless drivers I needed to install a few packages from contrib/non-free, so I enabled them in my sources.list and ran:

# aptitude install firmware-ipw3945 ipw3945-modules-`uname -r` ipw3945d

Then I added the line "ipw3945" to /etc/modules, rebooted, and my wireless worked perfectly.

As for the memory card readers, do you mean the little thing in the front with the letters "SD" on it? If so, I haven't found any use for it yet, so I haven't tried to get it working; But you can try it from a Debian LiveCD or something, and if it works out of the box in Ubuntu 6.10 (Without the System76 drivers) it should work fine in Debian.

Or, you can email System76 and ask them to package their drivers for you, without the restriction of only being usable on Ubuntu.
Jabber: pobega@gmail.com
Pronunciation: Poh - Bay - Guh
User avatar
Pobega
 
Posts: 870
Joined: 2007-01-04 04:30
Location: New York

PreviousNext

Return to Offtopic

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests

fashionable