Public service announcement

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Public service announcement

Postby GMouse » 2007-06-07 18:45

Lose == to cease to be in possession of, as in "I will lose my dog."
Loose == to let free or unleash, as in "I will loose my dog upon that small child."

Affect == verb, except in psychological jargon
Effect == noun

Thank you.

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Postby Optional » 2007-06-07 19:15

Also:

its = first person singular possessive! e.g. "Its cost was the largest selling point."

it's = IT IS e.g. "It's annoying how 99% of native English speakers can't even use their own language properly."

----

there = used to indicate a location or a point in a given process or sequence of events e.g. "He went over there." or "There he goes again."

they're = THEY ARE e.g. "They're so stupid!"

their = third person plural possessive e.g. "Their attitudes require... readjustment."

----

When people mix those up, it really makes me mad :< :lol:
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Postby diego1116 » 2007-06-07 19:23

Nice topic, specially (especially?) for non-native English speakers :P
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Postby GMouse » 2007-06-07 19:48

diego1116 wrote:Nice topic, specially (especially?) for non-native English speakers :P


Why thank you. I just get irritated with people, native speakers no less, who keep making some of these mistakes.
Last edited by GMouse on 2007-06-07 19:49, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby rduke » 2007-06-07 19:48

And almost everyone under the age of 40
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Postby Optional » 2007-06-07 21:01

rduke wrote:And almost everyone under the age of 40


I've seen quite a few people over the age of 40 making these mistakes... :roll:

Another one that just came to mind:

then: only used with time-related things (giving a set of directions, explaining what orders things happened in) e.g. "Go left, THEN go right." or "He walked home, then went straight to his room".

than: demonstrative pronoun (used with comparisons and anything not related to time) e.g. "He is fatter than him." or "Russian is harder to learn than Finnish."

----

English has too many homonyms :roll:

Edit:

GMouse wrote:loose


Loose also means the opposite of 'tight' e.g. "The ropes were loose." or "Your mom is loose." :lol:
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Re: Public service announcement

Postby Pobega » 2007-06-07 21:25

GMouse wrote:Affect == verb, except in psychological jargon
Effect == noun


Thanks for this one, I asked one of my teachers once and I got a horrible explanation back, which explains me ever using it wrong.

"Affect is when it's done to you, effect is when you do it to someone else"
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Postby GMouse » 2007-06-07 22:30

Basically, when you affect something, you're having an effect.

The psychological exception is in reference to somebody's affect. The stress is on the first syllable. From Websters': "The emotional complex associated with an
idea or mental state. In hysteria, the affect is sometimes
entirely dissociated, sometimes transferred to another
than the original idea."
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Postby Optional » 2007-06-07 23:09

Affect as a noun is pronounced like 'ahh-fect'. The verb is more like 'uhh-fect'.

(in American English anyways... no idea what the Brits say)

You will very rarely see affect as a noun though... 99.9% of the time it's a verb. :D
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Postby sinical » 2007-06-08 00:30

Im straylian so Ill start spellin fronetikalee
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Postby detly » 2007-06-08 01:36

You can also effect a change in somthing (or have effected etc).

You may enjoy Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation...
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Postby bluesdog » 2007-06-08 02:31

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Postby Lavene » 2007-06-08 07:01

Words are fun... I love playing with words.
"When something, in effect, is done in affect, the effect might affect a lot of people"

Of course, not being a native English speaker makes it a bit easier to ignore the finer points of the language ;)

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Postby DeanLinkous » 2007-06-08 17:09

your - possessive case of you
ex . Your hair is a mess.
you're - contraction of "you are"
ex. You're going to brush your hair.
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Postby AgenT » 2007-06-08 19:00

That is a common problem word. However, it is rather easy to remember the spelling if the word is broken up.
de-finite-ly
Notice that finite is an English word in itself.
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