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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-09-03 12:23
by Head_on_a_Stick
Arch [testing]:

Image

I changed the GNOME top panel font with this snippet in ~/.themes/CustomFontTheme/gnome-shell/gnome-shell.css:
Code: Select all
stage {
font-family: "Cantarell", "Sans";
}

That then allows the universal "Sans" alias to be set (for all applications) via ~/.config/fontconfig/fonts.conf (see /etc/fonts/fonts.conf for examples using the correct syntax) :)

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-09-05 20:19
by Head_on_a_Stick
Alpine Linux running dwm, st. tmux, fortune(1), neofetch and some commands for the busybox-based OpenRC init system:

Image

Still no wallpaper :D

EDIT: just noticed from the scrot that my firewall wasn't up, oh dear.

It is now though:
Code: Select all
empty@alpine:~ $ rc-service nftables status
 * status: started
empty@alpine:~ $

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-09-06 00:16
by HuangLao
SalixOS/Slackware with Xfce, wallpaper compliments of Xubuntu..... :lol:
Image

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-09-10 21:33
by Head_on_a_Stick
Image

Same operating system, different hardware. And a wallpaper.

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-09-18 10:59
by oswaldkelso
Dragora 2.2

Thought I'd better get some practice in ready for the up and coming all new and shinny Dragora 3 (D3) alpha. http://dragora.org/repo.fsl/timeline
Yes, even us freetards know how to have fun. This was a joke that turned into a theme.

Image

larger
http://picpaste.com/2017-09-17-Dragora- ... k5GT1W.png

The Dragora-stallman openbox theme is here.
https://www.box-look.org/p/1191774/

Wallpaper is available under CC-BY-SA but really was a quick hack and needs a remake.

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-09-19 20:19
by Head_on_a_Stick
^ Nice! :D

oswaldkelso wrote:Wallpaper is available under CC-BY-SA

I do hope that's not under v2.0 or v2.5... :mrgreen:

I've installed Alpine Linux on my hard drive now, I love it to bits:

Image

(That's the spacefm file manager and two rxvt-unicode client windows running neofetch and vim open at an APKBUILD for 9base)

systemd is now in a minority when it comes to init systems in our house :|

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-09-21 20:10
by ruffwoof
Pretty much the same as my Debian Jessie ... which looks like

Image

Similar for my FreeBSD and XenialPup64 multi-boots.

All use xorg, jwm, pcmanfm base (with pcmanfm --desktop providing desktop icon support).

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-10-08 12:08
by Head_on_a_Stick
Image

Development version of BunsenLabs Helium booting with OpenRC and the new openrc-init binary, no sysvinit or systemd required :D

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-10-09 19:13
by Nili
Image
Wallpaper: A port part in TOKYO

DEVUAN
Launcher tint2 Icons: Lances Two
WM: herbstluftwm / tint2 / conky

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-10-10 05:40
by Head_on_a_Stick
Image

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-10-14 13:50
by Head_on_a_Stick
Alpine Linux (edge branch) running dwm & slstatus with an rxvt-unicode client window:

Image

Lean.

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-10-14 16:25
by VentGrey
Alpine Linux (edge branch) running dwm & slstatus with an rxvt-unicode client window:


+10 lynx, I love your wm configs :mrgreen:

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-10-15 07:42
by Head_on_a_Stick
^ Thanks!

I've added some links for the configs, in case anybody is interested but note that my dwm fork doesn't do xinerama.

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-10-20 20:38
by ruffwoof
With the recent release of OpenBSD 6.2 I gave it another try. Last time I tried OpenBSD it wasn't much of a success as it didn't work well with nvidia (windows were laggy to drag around), so this time I used the onboard Radeon ATI and its working really well.

(clickable thumbnail)
Image

I opted to use 3 gkrellm's, each set to a relatively small height and positioned them side by side in the top left (disk, cpu, net). I matched the jwm tray height to the same along with matching the colours (my preference is a jwm and pcmanfm --desktop base system). I've set the clock (top left) so that left click acts as show/hide desktop toggle and right mouse click activates MENU. I also added in a borderless/titleless terminal window sized to 60x7 characters that opens below those gkrellm's and that displays/runs htop ... which adds visibility of my CPU's 4 cores (along with some other data/stats). So collectively the desktop is quite animated/active.

Some programs added to the tray i.e. right click of osmo or libre quicklauncher presents dropdown menu for notes/calendar/events and office type choices, other tray buttons directly start programs (firefox, terminal ...etc.). Some icons also put on the desktop for drag/drop operations (e.g. drag a file manager .jpg file to desktop mtpaint program icon opens up mtpaint with that .jpg file ready to be edited).

The basic OpenBSD install was a breeze as was adding packages (pkg_add instead of apt-get). Much nicer than FreeBSD IMO as it more or less all comes pre-configured. Apparently syspatch updates the core system, pkg_add -u updates programs and both worked smoothly (similar to apt-get update, apt-get upgrade). Adding softdep,noatime to each rw ffs filesystem helped improve overall operational speed (switches from being very secure synchronous disk IO to async/buffering ... with considerable speed improvement but foregoes some security/stability (not really a issue for a desktop system, more of a concern for heavily loaded large servers)).

Liking it a lot. Especially having the gkrellm's flashing away as part of the taskbar (still visible when programs are maximised).

Negatives : 6 monthly releases, each release supported for a year, means having to reinstall (upgrade) relatively frequently (6 monthly/1 year), at least if you want to be kept security patched (compared to sticking perhaps for 4 years with a Debian release). Repositories are much more limited ... however personally sufficient to cater for my needs. A lot less usage (at least from a desktop perspective), so google searches tend to result in far fewer associated results than Debian/Linux in general.

I like it a lot, enough to be a keeper, now have it set as my default boot and will stick with that at least for a while (maybe even longer term). I've removed my nvidia card (after the dry summer months I like to dust out the inside of the PC) and it runs really quiet now and when idle CPU usage drops and stays at 0% (runs a lot cooler also).

Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

PostPosted: 2017-10-20 21:52
by Head_on_a_Stick
ruffwoof wrote:Apparently syspatch updates the core system, pkg_add -u updates programs

Not quite — OpenBSD only supplies third-party binaries for -release (and -current) whereas syspatch(8) upgrades your base system to -stable so then you have to compile your own updated packages from the ports tree.

I would recommend -current for desktop use as it makes maintenance considerably simpler: just boot from /bsd.rd to update to the latest snapshot and use `pkg_add -u` to get the binary updates for third-party packages.

https://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq5.html#Flavors