Cold vs warm start

Getting your soundcard to work, using Debian on non-i386 hardware, etc

Cold vs warm start

Postby Martin25 » 2018-03-26 11:51

Hello,

I'd like to know in details what is the difference between a cold start ( switching on ) and warm start ( reboot ) of my laptop. Especially how Debian handles it, and whether it is possible to debug it somehow.

In case it is version dependent:
Code: Select all
uname -a
Linux debian 4.9.0-6-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 4.9.82-1+deb9u3 (2018-03-02) x86_64 GNU/Linux


I assume that this question may help me to find a solution to my second question viewtopic.php?f=7&t=136825 where Windows probably set my snd card into working state which cannot be set by Debian.
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Re: Cold vs warm start

Postby acewiza » 2018-03-26 12:41

Martin25 wrote:I'd like to know in details what is the difference between a cold start ( switching on ) and warm start ( reboot ) of my laptop.

The only difference is your finger pressing the on/off switch. The OS does not see any difference. There is a small possibility certain hardware malfunctions become affected by a power cycle, but that is entirely unique to the specific failure condition and likely NOT your issue.
Nobody would ever ask questions If everyone possessed encyclopedic knowledge of the man pages.
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Re: Cold vs warm start

Postby Segfault » 2018-03-26 13:23

I'm not a Windows user, but I hear Windows can do weird things to your BIOS/UEFI settings. Without asking users permission of course. Why should it, you do not own the copy of Windows you run and Windows thinks you do not own the hardware, either, after handing it over to Windows. MS Windows is an insult to any computer enthusiast, in many ways.
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Re: Cold vs warm start

Postby Martin25 » 2018-03-28 10:47

Thank you for your answers.

I would, however, appreciate some more details.
There is a small possibility certain hardware malfunctions become affected by a power cycle, but that is entirely unique to the specific failure condition and likely NOT your issue.

What makes you think that it's not my case?

I hear Windows can do weird things to your BIOS/UEFI settings.


I assume any changes to BIOS should remain even after turning off a computer, shouldn't they? That would imply that I need to boot into Window only once and then all would be fine.

The only difference is your finger pressing the on/off switch.

If the only difference between restart and switching off/on a computer were pressing the on/off button, how would you explain this empirical observation:
1) turning on and booting into Debian => some hardware doesn't work properly ( in my particular example my MIC )
2) turning on and booting into Windows with immediate restart into Debian => hardware works fine,
When hardware works fine in Debian, restart laptop and boot into Debian => hardware still works fine
Switching off from a working Debian session with a subsequent boot directly into Debian => hardware doesn't work
3) turning on and booting into Windows, switching off, switching on with booting into Debian => hardware doesn't work

I am sorry to bother you with a probably stupid question, but my only reasonable explanation for this observation is that there must indeed be some difference.
My naive hypothesis is:
Windows drivers set my snd card inner state register into proper state and this state is preserved during reboot ( probably volatile memory ) but not during switch off/on cycle. Debian then better handles my snd card in this working state than in a default state set, probably by BIOS, during cold start.
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Re: Cold vs warm start

Postby None1975 » 2018-03-28 13:36

Cold Start. Cold start refers to starting the CPU from power off. Current configuration is discarded and program processing begins again with the initial values. Warm Start. Warm start refers to restarting the CPU without turning the power off. Program processing starts once again where Retentive data is retained.
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