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Postby awfulman » 2006-12-17 01:47

I wonder, what is the best manual for beginners to start programming in java?
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Java Programming

Postby michael7 » 2006-12-18 00:15

Here's one on-line from wikibooks. Can't beat the price.

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Java_Programming
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Postby awfulman » 2006-12-20 17:33

Thank you, michael7. Your link is very useful.
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Postby michaelbarton49 » 2007-02-05 22:30

If you're new to programming the o'reilly books are usually good

http://www.oreilly.com/store/complete.html

particularly the head first series

http://www.oreilly.com/store/series/headfirst.csp

If you become serious and more interested this is my favorite

http://java.sun.com/docs/books/effective/

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Postby swirling_vortex » 2007-02-17 01:05

I've read some of the O'Reilly books and found them a little hard to digest. Then again, I usually needs things explained straight and simple.

Sam's works for me:
http://www.amazon.com/Sams-Teach-Yourself-Programming-Hours/dp/0672328445/sr=8-1/qid=1171673812/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-5088499-6376855?ie=UTF8&s=books

Note: If you want to program in Debian, I highly recommend enabling a testing repo and downloading sun-java5-jdk and sun-java5-plugin. Then, disable the repo. (This is if you still want to use the stable packages. Otherwise, all you have to do is download the mentioned packages.) At least that's how I did it.

I prefer Netbeans 5.5, but picking an IDE is a whole new topic that's just as bad as a distro war. :wink:
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Postby plugwash » 2007-02-17 03:49

Note: If you want to program in Debian, I highly recommend enabling a testing repo and downloading sun-java5-jdk and sun-java5-plugin. Then, disable the repo. (This is if you still want to use the stable packages. Otherwise, all you have to do is download the mentioned packages.) At least that's how I did it.

In this particular case you are safe (at least unless the packages are changed) but in general be very carefull doing stuff like that, its all too easy to upgrade something like libc6 as a dependency of something and that can break a lot of stuff!
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Postby synux » 2007-02-17 07:47

plugwash wrote:
Note: If you want to program in Debian, I highly recommend enabling a testing repo and downloading sun-java5-jdk and sun-java5-plugin. Then, disable the repo. (This is if you still want to use the stable packages. Otherwise, all you have to do is download the mentioned packages.) At least that's how I did it.

In this particular case you are safe (at least unless the packages are changed) but in general be very carefull doing stuff like that, its all too easy to upgrade something like libc6 as a dependency of something and that can break a lot of stuff!

It's always a good idea to emulate Debian in QEMU.. Right now I have a QEMU image called "crazy.img" where I have dared to install APT from experimental... but it runs fine :)
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Postby swirling_vortex » 2007-02-17 15:06

plugwash wrote:
Note: If you want to program in Debian, I highly recommend enabling a testing repo and downloading sun-java5-jdk and sun-java5-plugin. Then, disable the repo. (This is if you still want to use the stable packages. Otherwise, all you have to do is download the mentioned packages.) At least that's how I did it.

In this particular case you are safe (at least unless the packages are changed) but in general be very carefull doing stuff like that, its all too easy to upgrade something like libc6 as a dependency of something and that can break a lot of stuff!


I know it works without problems because, well, I just did it. :D In fact, the only dependencies were just the sun-java5 packages.

But plugwash is right because if you try to download an update for openoffice or something else, it will attempt to erase & upgrade a whole bunch of packages, which isn't good for a stable system. Most of the time that method does not work.

Anyway, pick a book & start making fresh cups of java!
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Postby javahaxxor » 2007-04-09 18:55

http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/ is a good place to start. then you have to decide on what you want to focus, such as Java for the web, client GUI programming, etc. Trying everything will take a long time and can get you confused.
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