Howto: dwm configuration and installation

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Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby Loomx » 2011-06-06 11:56

dwm (dynamic window manager) is a minimalist tiling window manager, famous for being ultra-lightweight and infamous for needing to be recomplied every time you make changes to the configuration. This has led to it gaining a reputation as “experts only”, but the aim of this howto is to show that this is not necessarily the case. For me, after using openbox, fluxbox, ratpoison, evilwm, icewm, I found that I knew what features I wanted and what I didn’t, and dwm just does its job with minimal fuss and maximum speed.

This howto is aimed at anyone from low-intermediate level upwards. You will need to be familiar with the terminal, root vs normal user commands and the basic Debian file-system structure (but the less you know now, the more you learn as you go, right? :) )
This howto also assumes that you are familiar with using a window manager, such as openbox, as opposed to a Desktop Environment like Gnome, KDE or XFCE.
Substitute 'apt-get' for 'aptitude' if you prefer.

Any commands with a # at the start means “as root”.

Overview:
Part 1: Preparation
Part 2: Configuration
Part 3: Installation


* Note: This howto will discuss two ways of installing dwm: the generic, quick-and-dirty “make install” way, and the ‘proper’ APT/Debian way. Both ways have their ups and downs; as always, it’s your system, just be aware of your choices.


***************************************************************
Part 1: Preparation

Before we start, let’s get the dependencies: (they are probably already on your system if you’re using X anyway)

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# aptitude install libc6 libx11-6 libxinerama1


We’ll need the build-dependencies, and also make and gcc:

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# aptitude build-dep dwm
# aptitude install make gcc


Also, we’ll want an application launcher like dmenu, although you could use gmrun or similar. dmenu is part of this package:

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# aptitude install suckless-tools


The default font for the status bar is Terminus, so if you want that you'll need this package:

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# aptitude install xfonts-terminus


dwm can be installed as a normal package, but that would kind of defeat the purpose as you wouldn’t be able to customise it :D

So, make a directory to put the dwm source into, for example:

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mkdir ~/Build


Then move into that directory, download the source, then move into the new dwm directory:

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cd ~/Build
apt-get source dwm
cd dwm_6.0 # (or whatever it is)


Have a look at what you have now; check out the README in particular.
But what we really want to do is customise this baby, so...


*****************************************************************
Part 2: Configuration

Copy the default config file to config.h then open it.
Use whatever editor you prefer to modify config.h, but I would recommend using one that allows syntax highlighting to help you understand what you’re doing :)

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cp config.def.h config.h
vim config.h


It’s pretty well commented, but we'll take a look through it bit by bit:

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/* See LICENSE file for copyright and license details. */

/* appearance */
static const char font[]            = "-*-terminus-medium-r-*-*-16-*-*-*-*-*-*-*";
static const char normbordercolor[] = "#cccccc";
static const char normbgcolor[]     = "#cccccc";
static const char normfgcolor[]     = "#000000";
static const char selbordercolor[]  = "#0066ff";
static const char selbgcolor[]      = "#0066ff";
static const char selfgcolor[]      = "#ffffff";
static const unsigned int borderpx  = 1;        /* border pixel of windows */
static const unsigned int snap      = 32;       /* snap pixel */
static const Bool showbar           = True;     /* False means no bar */
static const Bool topbar            = True;     /* False means bottom bar */

You can define the font the way you would for an xterm. The bottom two lines define whether it will be hidden and where it will be. Easy huh?
The selected window has a one-pixel border by default, of color #0066ff (red, I think)
The background and foreground colors refer to the status bar.


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/* tagging */
static const char *tags[] = { "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9" };

static const Rule rules[] = {
        /* class      instance    title       tags mask     isfloating   monitor */
        { "Gimp",     NULL,       NULL,       0,            True,        -1 },
        { "Firefox",  NULL,       NULL,       1 << 8,       False,       -1 },
};

dwm has multiple desktops, but they’re called tags and work slightly differently. By default they are numbered 1-9, but you can rename them however you want, just put the names in quotes.
The rules define how certain windows get treated, e.g. Gimp is always floating (not tiled or monocle/fullscreen) as it doesn't work properly otherwise.
The “tags mask” defines which tag the window appears on. Basically read the “<<“ as “+”, so “1 << 8” means Firefox will be on tag 9.
0 means any tag.


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/* layout(s) */
static const float mfact      = 0.55; /* factor of master area size [0.05..0.95] */
static const Bool resizehints = True; /* True means respect size hints in tiled resizals */

static const Layout layouts[] = {
        /* symbol     arrange function */
        { "[]=",      tile },    /* first entry is default */
        { "><>",      NULL },    /* no layout function means floating behavior */
        { "[M]",      monocle },
};

dwm has three layouts: tiling, floating (normal 'Windows' mode) and monocle (fullscreen). Here you can set the default layout, and the funky little symbol that will appear in the status bar.
Above that you can select the amount of the screen that the master window takes up.


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/* key definitions */
#define MODKEY Mod1Mask
#define TAGKEYS(KEY,TAG) \
        { MODKEY,                       KEY,      view,           {.ui = 1 << TAG} }, \
        { MODKEY|ControlMask,           KEY,      toggleview,     {.ui = 1 << TAG} }, \
        { MODKEY|ShiftMask,             KEY,      tag,            {.ui = 1 << TAG} }, \
        { MODKEY|ControlMask|ShiftMask, KEY,      toggletag,      {.ui = 1 << TAG} },

By default the modifier key is Alt (“Mod1Mask”). You could change it to Super/Windows by using "Mod4Mask" if you preferred.
The TAGKEYS set what happens if you press the number for a tag along with a modifier, so Alt-3 will take you to tag 3, while Alt-Shift-3 will tag (attach) a window to tag 3.


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/* helper for spawning shell commands in the pre dwm-5.0 fashion */
#define SHCMD(cmd) { .v = (const char*[]){ "/bin/sh", "-c", cmd, NULL } }

I think this part speaks for itself :)


Now we get to the guts of it, the commands:

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/* commands */
static const char *dmenucmd[] = { "dmenu_run", "-fn", font, "-nb", normbgcolor, "-nf", normfgcolor, "-sb", selbgcolor, "-sf", selfgcolor, NULL };
static const char *termcmd[]  = { "uxterm", NULL };

static Key keys[] = {
        /* modifier                     key        function        argument */
        { MODKEY,                       XK_p,      spawn,          {.v = dmenucmd } },
        { MODKEY|ShiftMask,             XK_Return, spawn,          {.v = termcmd } },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_b,      togglebar,      {0} },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_j,      focusstack,     {.i = +1 } },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_k,      focusstack,     {.i = -1 } },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_h,      setmfact,       {.f = -0.05} },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_l,      setmfact,       {.f = +0.05} },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_Return, zoom,           {0} },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_Tab,    view,           {0} },
        { MODKEY|ShiftMask,             XK_c,      killclient,     {0} },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_t,      setlayout,      {.v = &layouts[0]} },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_f,      setlayout,      {.v = &layouts[1]} },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_m,      setlayout,      {.v = &layouts[2]} },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_space,  setlayout,      {0} },
        { MODKEY|ShiftMask,             XK_space,  togglefloating, {0} },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_0,      view,           {.ui = ~0 } },
        { MODKEY|ShiftMask,             XK_0,      tag,            {.ui = ~0 } },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_comma,  focusmon,       {.i = -1 } },
        { MODKEY,                       XK_period, focusmon,       {.i = +1 } },
        { MODKEY|ShiftMask,             XK_comma,  tagmon,         {.i = -1 } },
        { MODKEY|ShiftMask,             XK_period, tagmon,         {.i = +1 } },
        TAGKEYS(                        XK_1,                      0)
        TAGKEYS(                        XK_2,                      1)
        TAGKEYS(                        XK_3,                      2)
        TAGKEYS(                        XK_4,                      3)
        TAGKEYS(                        XK_5,                      4)
        TAGKEYS(                        XK_6,                      5)
        TAGKEYS(                        XK_7,                      6)
        TAGKEYS(                        XK_8,                      7)
        TAGKEYS(                        XK_9,                      8)
        { MODKEY|ShiftMask,             XK_q,      quit,           {0} },
};

The first two commands in the long list spawn commands; note how those commands are defined above that, with each separate part of the command in quotes and with NULL at the end. So any commands you wanted to add would need to be defined under ‘commands’, then called in the ‘keys’ section.
XK_p means the button ’p’, etc.
If instead of ‘MODKEY’ you put ‘0’, that would mean ‘no modifier’.
‘focusstack’ means next or previous window, depending on the +1 or -1
‘setmfact’ means set the size of the master window in tiling mode
‘zoom’ is move a window to the master window in tiling mode
‘setlayout’ chooses a layout based on the order defined earlier, starting numbering from 0
The TAGKEYS select the tags - note that the tags as far as dwm is concerned number from 0-8.
Lastly, Alt-Shift-q quits dwm and takes you back to a tty.


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/* button definitions */
/* click can be ClkLtSymbol, ClkStatusText, ClkWinTitle, ClkClientWin, or ClkRootWin */
static Button buttons[] = {
        /* click                event mask      button          function        argument */
        { ClkLtSymbol,          0,              Button1,        setlayout,      {0} },
        { ClkLtSymbol,          0,              Button3,        setlayout,      {.v = &layouts[2]} },
        { ClkWinTitle,          0,              Button2,        zoom,           {0} },
        { ClkStatusText,        0,              Button2,        spawn,          {.v = termcmd } },
        { ClkClientWin,         MODKEY,         Button1,        movemouse,      {0} },
        { ClkClientWin,         MODKEY,         Button2,        togglefloating, {0} },
        { ClkClientWin,         MODKEY,         Button3,        resizemouse,    {0} },
        { ClkTagBar,            0,              Button1,        view,           {0} },
        { ClkTagBar,            0,              Button3,        toggleview,     {0} },
        { ClkTagBar,            MODKEY,         Button1,        tag,            {0} },
        { ClkTagBar,            MODKEY,         Button3,        toggletag,      {0} },
};

Here you define what happens when you click in various places, with and without the mod keys.
‘ClkLtSymbol’ means ‘click layout symbol’.

**********************************************************

As you can see, there are a lot of options. The default config basically chucks them all in so you can use what you need and ditch what you don’t.
I have found that I don’t need most of the options, so here is my config.h for reference after I took to it with a knife and added a couple of tricks:


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/* See LICENSE file for copyright and license details. */

/* appearance */
static const char font[]            = "7x14";
static const char normbordercolor[] = "#000000";
static const char normbgcolor[]     = "#cccccc";
static const char normfgcolor[]     = "#000000";
static const char selbordercolor[]  = "#cccccc";
static const char selbgcolor[]      = "#0066ff";
static const char selfgcolor[]      = "#ffffff";
static const unsigned int borderpx  = 1;        /* border pixel of windows */
static const unsigned int snap      = 32;       /* snap pixel */
static const Bool showbar           = True;    /* False means no bar */
static const Bool topbar            = True;     /* False means bottom bar */

Different font; selected window border is white.


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/* tagging */
static const char *tags[] = { "Here", "There" };

static const Rule rules[] = {
   /* class          instance     title    tags mask    isfloating   monitor */
   {  NULL,          NULL,        NULL,    0,           False,       -1 },
};

Two tags, “Here” and "There"; I don’t tend to run many windows at once. No rules as I haven’t found I needed any (but you still need to keep this line in here with ‘NULL’)


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/* layout(s) */
static const float mfact      = 0.5; /* factor of master area size [0.05..0.95] */
static const Bool resizehints = False; /* True means respect size hints in tiled resizals */

static const Layout layouts[] = {
   /* symbol     arrange function */
   { "[ ]",      monocle },    /* first entry is default */
   { "[]=",      tile },
};

Monocle (fullscreen) mode by default, and if I switch to tiling it’s usually with two windows so I split the screen 50:50
‘resizehints = false’ so terminal windows don’t leave odd gaps around the edges.


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/* key definitions */
#define MODKEY Mod1Mask
#define TAGKEYS(KEY,TAG) \
   { MODKEY,                       KEY,      view,           {.ui = 1 << TAG} }, \
   { MODKEY|ControlMask,           KEY,      toggleview,     {.ui = 1 << TAG} }, \
   { MODKEY|ShiftMask,             KEY,      tag,            {.ui = 1 << TAG} }, \
   { MODKEY|ControlMask|ShiftMask, KEY,      toggletag,      {.ui = 1 << TAG} },
#include <X11/XF86keysym.h>

/* helper for spawning shell commands in the pre dwm-5.0 fashion */
#define SHCMD(cmd) { .v = (const char*[]){ "/bin/sh", "-c", cmd, NULL } }

Note the line added in here (‘#include <X11/XF86keysym.h>’) - this means you can refer to your XF86 keys in the next section.


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/* commands */
static const char *dmenucmd[]         = { "dmenu_run", "-fn", font, "-nb", normbgcolor, "-nf", normfgcolor, "-sb", selbgcolor, "-sf", selfgcolor, NULL };
static const char *termcmd[]          = { "xterm", "-rv", "-fn", font, NULL };
static const char *chromiumcmd[]      = { "chromium-browser", "--proxy-server=172.31.232.250:3128", NULL };
static const char *play[]             = { "mocp", "-G", NULL };
static const char *stop[]             = { "mocp", "-x", NULL };
static const char *prev[]             = { "mocp", "-r", NULL };
static const char *next[]             = { "mocp", "-f", NULL };
static const char *mute[]             = { "amixer", "-q", "set", "Master", "toggle", NULL };
static const char *volumedown[]       = { "amixer", "-q", "set", "Master", "2%-", "unmute", NULL };
static const char *volumeup[]         = { "amixer", "-q", "set", "Master", "2%+", "unmute", NULL };
static const char *eject[]            = { "eject", NULL };

Most apps I run from dmenu, but if you need to use something regularly with command line options, like chromium with a proxy server, you can define it here to call with a keybind.
Also you need to define what command each of your XF86 keys will execute.


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static Key keys[] = {
   /* modifier                key                              function        argument */
   { 0,                       XF86XK_Launch1,                  spawn,          {.v = dmenucmd } },
   { 0,                       XK_F6,                           spawn,          {.v = termcmd } },
   { 0,                       XK_F7,                           spawn,          {.v = chromiumcmd  } },
   { 0,                       XF86XK_AudioPlay,                spawn,          {.v = play}},
   { 0,                       XF86XK_AudioStop,                spawn,          {.v = stop}},
   { 0,                       XF86XK_AudioPrev,                spawn,          {.v = prev}},
   { 0,                       XF86XK_AudioNext,                spawn,          {.v = next}},
   { 0,                       XF86XK_AudioMute,                spawn,          {.v = mute}},
   { 0,                       XF86XK_AudioLowerVolume,         spawn,          {.v = volumedown}},
   { 0,                       XF86XK_AudioRaiseVolume,         spawn,          {.v = volumeup}},
   { 0,                       XF86XK_Eject,                    spawn,          {.v = eject}},
   { MODKEY,                  XK_Tab,                          focusstack,     {.i = +1 } },
   { MODKEY,                  XK_space,                        setlayout,      {0} },
   { MODKEY,                  XK_z,                            zoom,           {0} },
   { MODKEY,                  XK_q,                            killclient,     {0} },
   { MODKEY|ControlMask,      XK_q,                            quit,           {0} },
   TAGKEYS(                   XK_comma,                                        0)
   TAGKEYS(                   XK_period,                                       1)
};

I’ve tried to stick to keybinds that don’t interfere with other apps, e.g. Alt-p is used to select ‘print’ on a print dialog page, so I've avoided that.
The XF86 key "Launch1" for dmenu is actually the Super/Windows key, which I remap in ~/.xinitrc (see near the end of this howto)
Alt-space simply toggles between monocle and tiling modes, as they are the only modes I specified earlier.
Alt-comma and alt-period are for "Here" and "There" tags.


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static Button buttons[] = {
   /* click                event mask      button          function        argument */
   { ClkLtSymbol,          0,              Button1,        setlayout,      {0} },
   { ClkWinTitle,          0,              Button1,        spawn,          {.v = dmenucmd } },
   { ClkWinTitle,          0,              Button3,        spawn,          {.v = termcmd } },
   { ClkTagBar,            0,              Button1,        view,           {0} },
   { ClkTagBar,            ControlMask,    Button1,        toggleview,     {0} },
   { ClkTagBar,            0,              Button3,        tag,            {0} },
   { ClkTagBar,            ControlMask,    Button3,        toggletag,      {0} },
};

Click on the layout symbol to toggle tiling mode; click the status bar text and dmenu starts; right-click to get a terminal.
Click on a tag name to view it; right-click on a tag name to send a window to that tag.

So that’s mine; go to town, or just try the default first, whatever. When you're done there, it’s time for…

*******************************************************************

Part 3: Installation

a) The generic quick-and-dirty method

This is the method from the README file. It will put dwm into /usr/local/bin which is good for two reasons: that directory is empty by default in Debian, and it is already in your $PATH
The disadvantage of this method is that APT will not be aware of its existence, so you have been warned.
The advantage is that it is, well, quick:

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# make clean install


If you plan to tinker with your config.h a bit, each time you just need to run this command from the ~/Build/dwm_6.0 directory, then exit dwm (Alt-Ctrl-q in my case) and ‘startx’ again.


b) The ‘proper’ APT/Debian way

Once you have it set up how you want, you can make a .deb and install it properly.
This is straightforward too; just run this to make the .deb (from in the ~/Build/dwm_6.0 directory):

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dpkg-buildpackage -us -uc


This will spit out lots of output; the options given mean it shouldn't prompt you about unsigned files.
When it finishes you should find your .deb in the parent directory, so cd up one level and install like so (as root):

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cd ..
# dpkg -i dwm*.deb


Done! Now it’s official.

Don’t forget to uninstall the file at /usr/local/bin/dwm (if you used the quick-and-dirty method) like this:

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cd ~/Build/dwm_6.0
# make uninstall


You might also want to run
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# aptitude hold dwm

so your version doesn't get overwritten by an update if you're running testing or sid.

**************************

You need to make (or alter) the executable file ~/.xinitrc to start dwm
The last line in it should be
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exec [...] dwm


Here’s mine as an example; :

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#!/bin/sh

. ~/.fehbg              # set wallpaper
unclutter -root &       # hide cursor when unused

# Turn Super/Windows key into XF86Launch1
xmodmap -e "keycode 133 = XF86Launch1"

# Turn CapsLock into Control
xmodmap -e "clear lock" -e "keycode 66 = Control_R" -e "add Control = Control_R"

# Show memory use, volume %, battery % and time in status bar
while xsetroot -name "$(free -m | awk '/cache:/ { print $3"MB" }')  Vol:$(amixer get Master | tail -1 | awk '{ print $5 }' | tr -d '[]')  Batt:$(acpi | awk '{ print $4 }' | tr -d ',')  $(date +%R)"
    do
        sleep 1
    done &

# Launch system-wide stuff first, then dwm...
exec ck-launch-session dbus-launch dwm


Don’t forget to make it executable:

Code: Select all
chmod 755 ~/.xinitrc


Then just run
Code: Select all
startx

to get the whole show started.

**************************

Some sources:
http://dwm.suckless.org/tutorial
http://dwm.suckless.org/customisation/
http://www.xsnake.net/howto/dwm/dwm-eng.php
http://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Dwm
http://lubutu.com/rant/dwm-faq

You can also extend dwm with patches to add features like new layouts, such as b.stack (horizontal stacking, good for non-widescreens); see http://dwm.suckless.org/patches


Have fun!
Any errors in this howto are mine, and if you point them out I can fix them :)
(Edited many times for clarity and freshness)
Last edited by Loomx on 2013-04-10 09:32, edited 14 times in total.
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby Loomx » 2011-06-08 23:07

Ahhh, thanks...

(and this relates to dwm how?) :?
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby dmhdlr » 2011-06-09 02:31

I think it's spam. Great post BTW. This is exactly what I was looking for a couple of weeks ago when I considered giving dwm a try. But I didn't as I didn't have your guide! When I have time to try again I will come here. :D
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby Loomx » 2011-06-09 09:08

Cheers :)

Let us know how you get on if you give it a go..
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby janneman » 2011-11-29 19:44

Thank you for this post, Loomx. An excellent guide.

These XK keyboard codes were also useful for my crazy azerty keyboard:

& = XK_ampersand
é = XK_eacute
" = XK_quotedbl
' = XK_apostrophe
( = XK_parenleft
- = XK_minus
è = XK_egrave
_ = XK_underscore
ç = XK_ccedilla

Questions:
--------------------
1. Where can I find a complete list of the XK_ codes ? ( I got these from the azerty patch). I would like to use the § key.

2. I have a synaptic touchpad. Under dwm i can't use the scroll area. I also can't click by tapping the touchpad. I can set both under gnome. How can I set these under DWM?

EDIT: answer to question 2 (note that this is not really DWM related at all)

After reading the fine manual at: http://wiki.debian.org/SynapticsTouchpad I have managed to get it working by editing my /etc/X11/xorg.conf .
I added the following new section below the InputDevice section:
Code: Select all
Section "InputClass"
        Identifier      "Touchpad"                   # required
        MatchIsTouchpad "yes"                   # required
        Driver          "synaptics"                  # required
        Option          "TapButton1"        "1"  # tap to click
        Option          "VertEdgeScroll"   "1"  # edge scroll
EndSection


As a bonus I noticed my touchpad supports 2- and 3-finger stuff. I used this command to find that out:
Code: Select all
grep "TouchPad: buttons:" /var/log/Xorg.0.log

The output reads something like:
SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad: buttons: left right middle double triple
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby scottro » 2012-01-22 13:32

Just wanted to add my thanks for this article. I wish this had been written when I first used dwm, it would have saved me a lot of time.
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby Loomx » 2012-01-29 08:23

Cheers; it would have saved me a lot of time too :)

I've updated it a bit to reflect my current usage. After using Gnome shell for a bit, I like the idea of pushing one button to get a launcher. I've been using F5 to fire up dmenu, and it hasn't clashed with anything yet. Maybe I should remap the Super/Windows key and use that... I don't think you can use a modkey on its own.

dwm beats Gnome shell for speed though, and tiling is the trump card for me.

Edit: After a quick trial, you can't use a modkey on its own, so you have to remap "Super_L" to something else. I remapped it to "XF86Launch1" and now it launches dmenu :)
I'll update the original post to include this, just for the fun of it..
Last edited by Loomx on 2013-04-10 09:32, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby xlys » 2012-04-09 16:42

/* helper for spawning shell commands in the pre dwm-5.0 fashion */
#define SHCMD(cmd) { .v = (const char*[]){ "/bin/sh", "-c", cmd, NULL } }
dwm's version is at 6.0 now; I wonder how a shell command is supposed to be spawned in a post dwm-5.0 fashion? Anybody know?
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby Loomx » 2012-04-30 01:00

xlys wrote:dwm's version is at 6.0 now; I wonder how a shell command is supposed to be spawned in a post dwm-5.0 fashion? Anybody know?


This is just for backwards-compatibility with previous behaviour, I think.
It just ensures that the commands you define, such as "dmenucmd", get run as shell commands.

Edit: That's not quite right... actually it means you can define commands that need to be run as shell commands by putting them in like this:
Code: Select all
static Key keys[] = {
   /* modifier    key             function   argument */
...
   { 0,       XF86XK_AudioPlay,   spawn,     SHCMD("echo pause > ~/.mplayer/mp_pipe") },
...
}
Last edited by Loomx on 2013-04-10 09:35, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby djohngo » 2012-11-07 20:30

I'm having some trouble getting this to work with dpkg-buildpackage. I build the package as per these instructions, but none of my changes are in the resulting package. And when I diff config.def.h and config.h after building the package, the files are identical.

I noticed the following in the output:

Code: Select all
creating config.h from config.def.h
cp config.def.h config.h


So I tried making changes to config.def.h, and received the following message:

Code: Select all
dpkg-source: info: using options from dwm-6.0/debian/source/options: --compression=gzip --compression-level=9
dpkg-source: info: using source format `3.0 (quilt)'
dpkg-source: info: building dwm using existing ./dwm_6.0.orig.tar.gz
dpkg-source: info: local changes detected, the modified files are:
 dwm-6.0/config.def.h
dpkg-source: info: you can integrate the local changes with dpkg-source --commit
dpkg-source: error: aborting due to unexpected upstream changes, see /tmp/dwm_6.0-4.diff.FsYPbO
dpkg-buildpackage: error: dpkg-source -b dwm-6.0 gave error exit status 2


Any suggestions?
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby djohngo » 2012-11-07 21:29

Ok. I ran:

dpkg-buildpackage -rfakeroot -us -uc --source-option=--auto-commit

and it worked with a modified config.def.h.
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby Alessio1 » 2012-12-24 05:57

danny0085 wrote:Here you can check out the most used linux commands .




thanks for the link ....for last couple of days i found these . at least i win and found your link .
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby kosaidpo » 2013-04-30 10:04

hello guys

first off i want to say thanks to Loomx for this howto i really appreciated the experience of using dwm its really lightweight

my issue is ican 't get the status bar i 've read on the arch wiki and else where on the web by makin a shell script and call it with a file.desktop but nothing work

im using wheezy also when i download the satus.c file and put it in the source DIR dwm-6 when i launch the dpkg-buildpackage it stops with a message that i have to verify the changes in the file change.something (im not home so im sorry ican't post more details ill once im home )and i did not really get it


thanks in advance
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby Loomx » 2013-05-02 09:12

kosaidpo wrote:my issue is ican 't get the status bar i 've read on the arch wiki and else where on the web by makin a shell script and call it with a file.desktop but nothing work

I'm not sure exactly what you mean here; the easy way to get some info in your status bar is via a `while' loop in your ~/.xinitrc file. In the howto I mention how to do that, and there is another simple example in the dwm README that is included with the source code.

Note that the ~/.xinitrc file is an executable shell script that gets called by the command `startx'.
dwm will ignore .desktop files - there is no "desktop", after all :)

kosaidpo wrote:also when i download the status.c file and put it in the source DIR dwm-6 when i launch the dpkg-buildpackage it stops with a message that i have to verify the changes in the file change.something

If you are trying to make a status bar program using C code, this is a different thing altogether. In this case you need to compile the file (e.g. status.c) into a stand-alone program, then run it from your ~/.xinitrc

See my dstatus.c here
Last edited by Loomx on 2014-07-19 21:29, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Howto: dwm configuration and installation

Postby kosaidpo » 2013-05-02 11:53

loom thanks for your reply as i doubt it the .xinitrc does not get executed so i made a symbolic link to my .xsession and yeh now its workin thanks again
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