Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

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Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby Roaring Silence » 2011-02-15 00:36

Is there a way of changing the loud thump that announces the gdm login screen in Squeeze to something else? At the moment I cannot see how this can be easily done, other than turn event sounds off, which I don't want to do. Have I missed something? There seems to be very little event sound customisation in Squeeze, compared to Lenny.
Also is there a way of getting Squeeze to play a short exit sound on logout or reboot? I know how to turn off the annoying system beep, that is there at the moment. Is it possible to have a pleasant event sound instead?
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby emariz » 2011-02-15 02:02

How have you been setting them? I don't use GDM or a sound scheme, but one should be able to configure it through an item in System > Preferences.
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby Roaring Silence » 2011-02-15 11:03

Yes I am using gdm3 with Gnome in Squeeze.
In Lenny System>Preferences>Sound gave an applet in which lots of event sounds could be set or switched off.
In Squeeze System>Preferences>Sound gives me the Volume Control applet. At first I thought this must be an error, then I noticed that there is a sound theme tab, but it only allows you to change the sound theme, it allows no customisation of which events play which sound, as used to be possible in Lenny. I am disappointed about this. I have downloaded a new theme, Moblin, and it does at least give you a Welcome to gnome desktop sound, but no leaving sound, and the range of sounds it gives is very limited.
Also the thump one hears when the gdm3 login screen is ready does not appear to be any of the sounds in /usr/share/sounds, but created by a binary file in /usr/bin. I wondered if anyone else was concerned about this, and if anyone had found a way of introducing more appealing event sounds?
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby Roaring Silence » 2011-02-16 23:32

It is interesting to compare the scanty customisation that seems to be available for the login screen in the /etc/gdm3/greeter.gconf-defaults file in Squeeze

Code: Select all
# Use a specific background
#/desktop/gnome/background/picture_filename   /usr/share/images/desktop-base/login-background.svg
#/desktop/gnome/background/picture_options   zoom

# Theming options
#/desktop/gnome/interface/gtk_theme      Clearlooks

# Greeter options
/apps/gdm/simple-greeter/logo_icon_name    debian-swirl

# Play system beeps - especially the one when the greeter is ready
/desktop/gnome/sound/event_sounds      true

# Some other possible options
/apps/gdm/simple-greeter/banner_message_enable      true
/apps/gdm/simple-greeter/banner_message_text      Welcome to Debian - a solid, reliable Linux
#/apps/gdm/simple-greeter/disable_restart_buttons   false
#/apps/gdm/simple-greeter/disable_user_list      false
/apps/gdm/simple-greeter/sound_on_login_success      true

# The lower panel doesn't work with the compositor
/apps/metacity/general/compositing_manager      false

# Prevent the power management icon from showing up
/apps/gnome-power-manager/ui/icon_policy      never


with what used to be available in Lenny in the /usr/share/gdm/defaults.conf which was overwritten by changes to the parallel /etc/gdm/gdm.conf file

Code: Select all
[greeter]
# The following options for setting titlebar and setting window position are
# only useful for the standard login (gdmlogin) and are not used by the
# themed login (gdmgreeter).
#
# The standard login has a title bar that the user can move.
#TitleBar=true
# Don't allow user to move the standard login window.  Only makes sense if
# TitleBar is on.
#LockPosition=false
# Set a position for the standard login window rather then just centering the
# window.  If you enter negative values for the position it is taken as an
# offset from the right or bottom edge.
#SetPosition=false
#PositionX=0
#PositionY=0

# Enable the Face browser.  Note that the Browser key is only used by the
# standard login (gdmlogin) program.  The Face Browser is enabled in
# the Graphical greeter by selecting a theme that includes the Face
# Browser, such as happygnome-list.  The other configuration values that
# affect the Face Browser (MinimalUID, DefaultFace, Include, Exclude,
# IncludeAll, GlobalFaceDir) are used by both the Standard and Themed
# greeter.
Browser=true
# The default picture in the browser.
#DefaultFace=/usr/share/pixmaps/nobody.png
# User ID's less than the MinimalUID value will not be included in the face
# browser or in the gdmselection list for Automatic/Timed login.  They will not
# be displayed regardless of the settings for Include and Exclude.
MinimalUID=1000
# Users listed in Include will be included in the face browser and in the
# gdmsetup selection list for Automatic/Timed login.  Users should be separated
# by commas.
#Include=
# Users listed in Exclude are excluded from the face browser and from the
# gdmsetup selection list for Automatic/Timed login.  Excluded users will still
# be able to log in, but will have to type their username.  Users should be
# separated by commas. 
Exclude=nobody
# By default, an empty include list means display no users.  By setting
# IncludeAll to true, the password file will be scanned and all users will be
# displayed except users excluded via the Exclude setting and user ID's less
# than MinimalUID.  Scanning the password file can be slow on systems with
# large numbers of users and this feature should not be used in such
# environments.  The setting of IncludeAll does nothing if Include is set to a
# non-empty value.
IncludeAll=true
# If user or user.png exists in this dir it will be used as his picture.
#GlobalFaceDir=/usr/share/pixmaps/faces/

# File which contains the locale we show to the user.  Likely you want to use
# the one shipped with GDM and edit it.  It is not a standard locale.alias
# file, although GDM will be able to read a standard locale.alias file as well.
LocaleFile=/etc/gdm/locale.conf
# Logo shown in the standard greeter.
Logo=/usr/share/pixmaps/gdmDebianLogo.xpm
# Logo shown on file chooser button in gdmsetup (do not modify this value).
#ChooserButtonLogo=/usr/share/pixmaps/gdm-foot-logo.png
# The standard greeter should shake if a user entered the wrong username or
# password.  Kind of cool looking
#Quiver=true

# The Actions menu (formerly system menu) is shown in the greeter, this is the
# menu that contains reboot, shutdown, suspend, config and chooser.  None of
# these is available if this is off.  They can be turned off individually
# however.
#SystemMenu=true
# Configuration is available from the system menu of the greeter.
#ConfigAvailable=true
# Should the chooser button be shown.  If this is shown, GDM can drop into
# chooser mode which will run the xdmcp chooser locally and allow the user to
# connect to some remote host.  Local XDMCP does not need to be enabled,
# however.
#ChooserButton=true

# Welcome is for all console logins and RemoteWelcome is for remote logins
# (through XDMCP).
# DefaultWelcome and DefaultRemoteWelcome set the string for Welcome to
# "Welcome" and for DefaultWelcome to "Welcome to %n", and properly translate
# the message to the appropriate language.  Note that %n gets translated to the
# hostname of the machine.  These default values can be overridden by setting
# DefaultWelcome and/or DefaultRemoteWelcome to false, and setting the Welcome
# and DefaultWelcome values as desired.  Just make sure the strings are in
# utf-8 Note to distributors, if you wish to have a different Welcome string
# and wish to have this translated you can have entries such as
# "Welcome[cs]=Vitejte na %n".
DefaultWelcome=true
DefaultRemoteWelcome=true
#Welcome=Welcome
#RemoteWelcome=Welcome to %n

# Xinerama screen we use to display the greeter on.  Not for true multihead,
# currently only works for Xinerama.
#XineramaScreen=0
# Background settings for the standard greeter:
# Type can be 0=None, 1=Image & Color, 2=Color, 3=Image
#BackgroundType=2
#BackgroundImage=
#BackgroundScaleToFit=true
# The Standard greeter (gdmlogin) uses BackgroundColor as the background
# color, while the themed greeter (gdmgreeter) uses GraphicalThemedColor
# as the background color.
BackgroundColor=#76848F
GraphicalThemedColor=#76848F
# XDMCP session should only get a color, this is the sanest setting since you
# don't want to take up too much bandwidth
#BackgroundRemoteOnlyColor=true

# Program to run to draw the background in the standard greeter.  Perhaps
# something like an xscreensaver hack or some such.
#BackgroundProgram=
# If this is true then the background program is run always, otherwise it is
# only run when the BackgroundType is 0 (None).
#RunBackgroundProgramAlways=false
# Delay before starting background program
#BackgroundProgramInitialDelay=30
# Should the background program be restarted if it is exited.
#RestartBackgroundProgram=true
# Delay before restarting background program
#BackgroundProgramRestartDelay=30

# Show the Failsafe sessions.  These are much MUCH nicer (focus for xterm for
# example) and more failsafe then those supplied by scripts so distros should
# use this rather then just running an xterm from a script.
#ShowGnomeFailsafeSession=true
#ShowXtermFailsafeSession=true
# Normally there is a session type called 'Last' that is shown which refers to
# the last session the user used.  If off, we will be in 'switchdesk' mode
# where the session saving stuff is disabled in GDM
#ShowLastSession=true
# Always use 24 hour clock no matter what the locale.
#Use24Clock=auto
# Do not show any visible feedback in the password field. This is standard for
# instance in console, xdm and ssh.
#UseInvisibleInEntry=false

# These two keys are for the themed greeter (gdmgreeter).  Circles is the
# standard shipped theme.  If you want GDM to select a random theme from a
# list then provide a list that is delimited by /: to the GraphicalThemes
# key and set GraphicalThemeRand to true.  Otherwise use GraphicalTheme
# and specify just one theme.
GraphicalTheme=debian-moreblue-orbit
#GraphicalThemes=debian-moreblue-orbit:/bijou/:blueswirl/:circles/:debblue-list/:debblue/:ayo/:debian-dawn/:debian-greeter/:debian/:glassfoot/:hantzley/:happygnome/:industrial/:crystal/:linsta
GraphicalThemeDir=/usr/share/gdm/themes/
GraphicalThemeRand=false

# If InfoMsgFile points to a file, the greeter will display the contents of the
# file in a modal dialog box before the user is allowed to log in.
#InfoMsgFile=
# If InfoMsgFile is present then InfoMsgFont can be used to specify the font to
# be used when displaying the contents of the file.
#InfoMsgFont=Sans 24

# If SoundOnLogin is true, then the greeter will beep when login is ready for
# user input.  If SoundOnLogin is a file and the greeter finds the 'play'
# executable (see daemon/SoundProgram) it will play that file instead of just
# beeping.
#SoundOnLogin=true
#SoundOnLoginFile=
# If SoundOnLoginSuccess, then the greeter will play a sound (as above) when a
# user successfully logs in.
#SoundOnLoginSuccess=false
#SoundOnLoginSuccessFile=
# If SoundOnLoginFailure, then the greeter will play a sound (as above) when a
# user fails to log in.
#SoundOnLoginFailure=false
#SoundOnLoginFailureFile=

# Specifies a program to be called by the greeter/login program when the
# initial screen is displayed.  The purpose is to provide a hook where files
# used after login can be preloaded to speed performance for the user. The
# program will only be called once only, the first time a greeter is displayed.
# The gdmprefetch command may be used.  This utility will load any libraries
# passed in on the command line, or if the argument starts with a "@"
# character, it will process the file assuming it is an ASCII file containing a
# list of libraries, one per line, and load each library in the file.
PreFetchProgram=/usr/lib/gdmprefetch @/etc/gdm/gdmprefetchlist

# The chooser is what's displayed when a user wants an indirect XDMCP session,
# or selects Run XDMCP chooser from the system menu
[chooser]
# Default image for hosts.
#DefaultHostImg=/usr/share/pixmaps/nohost.png
# Directory with host images, they are named by the hosts: host or host.png.
HostImageDir=/usr/share/hosts/
# Time we scan for hosts (well only the time we tell the user we are scanning
# actually, we continue to listen even after this has expired).
#ScanTime=4
# A comma separated lists of hosts to automatically add (if they answer to a
# query of course).  You can use this to reach hosts that broadcast cannot
# reach.
Hosts=
# Broadcast a query to get all hosts on the current network that answer.
Broadcast=true
# Set it to true if you want to send a multicast query to hosts.
Multicast=false
# It is an IPv6 multicast address.It is hardcoded here and will be replaced
# when officially registered xdmcp multicast address of TBD will be available.
#Multicast_Addr=ff02::1
# Allow adding random hosts to the list by typing in their names.
#AllowAdd=true


.............which is why some of us are concerned that we are in danger of losing something very valuable, which set Linux apart from commercial operating systems: viz its enormous scope for configuration and customisation.

Does anyone know if more options can be added to the: /etc/gdm3/greeter.gconf-defaults file in Squeeze? Has anyone had any success with greater customisation?
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby Roaring Silence » 2011-02-17 12:05

I am making some progress, but finding workarounds is not easy. I will take certain key event sounds one at a time, so as not to confuse anyone.
1) Firstly a Gnome start-up sound.
This will play after you have logged in with GDM while the Gnome desktop is booting up.
There is a file - "/usr/share/gnome/autostart/GNOME Login Sound" which is being read during Gnome startup, but with Squeeze as it is after installation nothing is being played.
Gnome Login Sound is a .desktop file and that is not its filename.

To find its filename you need to cd as root to the /usr/share/gnome/autostart/ folder and then

Code: Select all
root@debian:/usr/share/gnome/autostart# ls
at-spi-registryd.desktop       gnome-screensaver.desktop
bluetooth-applet.desktop       gnome-settings-daemon.desktop
gnome-at-session.desktop       gnome-settings-daemon-helper.desktop
gnome-keyring-pkcs11.desktop   gnome-user-share.desktop
gnome-keyring-secrets.desktop  gnome-volume-control-applet.desktop
gnome-keyring-ssh.desktop      libcanberra-login-sound.desktop
gnome-power-manager.desktop    vino-server.desktop
root@debian:/usr/share/gnome/autostart#


Now we can see that its filename is: libcanberra-login-sound.desktop --- So we need to inspect this file to see what is going on. Code:

Code: Select all
root@debian:/usr/share/gnome/autostart# nano libcanberra-login-sound.desktop


Code: Select all
[Desktop Entry]
Type=Application
Name=GNOME Login Sound
Comment=Plays a sound whenever you log in
Exec=/usr/bin/canberra-gtk-play --id="desktop-login" --description="GNOME Login"
OnlyShowIn=GNOME;
AutostartCondition=GNOME /desktop/gnome/sound/event_sounds
X-GNOME-Autostart-Phase=Application
X-GNOME-Provides=login-sound


Name here is its display name, and this is why it appears in the autostart folder as "GNOME Login Sound" but you cannot look into or alter this file by using this name.
The important line here is: Exec=/usr/bin/canberra-gtk-play --id="desktop-login" --description="GNOME Login"
/usr/bin/canberra-gtk-play is a binary and you cannot do much to alter that unless you know how to compile binaries, but you will see that it needs a file ID flag --id="desktop-login" The description flag --description="GNOME Login" is unimportant.
The ID flag tells the binary to look through the /usr/share/sounds folder until it finds a sound file with the name "desktop-login" This should either be an ogg file or a wav file.
I had previously downloaded the moblin-sound-theme, which was not very exciting so I customised it a bit.
Into the /usr/share/sounds/moblin/stereo/ folder I moved, as root, a suitable ogg sound file that I liked and named it: desktop-login.ogg
Now when gnome is booting up it plays this file.

NB You do not have to download an additional sound theme. Simply moving a file called desktop-login.ogg into your /usr/share/sounds folder will do the trick.
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby Roaring Silence » 2011-02-17 13:22

2) A Gnome is shutting down sound
After installation Gnome is not playing any shutdown sound.

Now, there is a short shell-script: /usr/share/gnome/shutdown/libcanberra-logout-sound.sh which reads:

Code: Select all
#!/bin/sh

/usr/bin/canberra-gtk-play --id="desktop-logout" --description="GNOME Logout"


which is not being read by the Gnome shutdown routine. I think this is because /etc/gdm3/PostSession/Default script is being read first, and that reads:

Code: Select all
#!/bin/sh

exit 0


so gdm3 and Gnome are exiting before /usr/share/gnome/shutdown/libcanberra-logout-sound.sh has a chance to be read.
So, if we want Gnome to play a shutdown sound before exiting, we need to add it to the /etc/gdm3/PostSession/Default script.
This is how I modified it, as root, of course.

Code: Select all
#!/bin/sh

/usr/bin/canberra-gtk-play --id="desktop-logout"

sleep 6

exit 0


The "sleep 6" line tells gdm3 to pause 6 seconds before exiting. This is necessary, because otherwise gdm3 will exit before the "canberra-gtk-play" binary has a chance to find the "desktop-logout" sound file and then play it. If it is a long sound file, you will need to play around with the sleep time to get the file to play correctly and not too fast.
I then needed a suitable "desktop-logout" sound file in my /usr/share/sounds/ folder. I found an ogg sound file that I liked and moved it as root to /usr/share/sounds/moblin/stereo/ as desktop-login.ogg
So, code:

Code: Select all
# mv ~/PATH-TO-SOUND-FILES/desktop-login.ogg /usr/share/sounds/moblin/stereo/


but I could just as well have moved it to the /usr/share/sounds folder.
Now Gnome plays a nice "ready to shutdown" sound before it leaves. Magic! Pity that could not have been explained as comments in the shell scripts.
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby Roaring Silence » 2011-02-17 13:57

But still that annoying, and ignorant, thump on the window pane as the gdm3 login screen appears. I still have not found a way of changing that. Can anyone help here?
Or does anyone know if it is, regrettably, coded into the "/usr/sbin/gdm3" binary?
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby emariz » 2011-02-17 16:59

This might not be the answer that you want to hear, but you could purge GDM3 and install GDM instead. I don't use a login manager but installed GDM in Wheezy last week, to troubleshoot an authentication issue.
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby oOarthurOo » 2011-02-17 17:32

Some excellent troubleshooting there Roaring. Is disabling the sound just on the gdm3 an option? There seems to be a toggle switch in gconf for sound on gdm alone, which should not affect system wide sounds. You'll follow instructions in the README.debian file in /usr/share/doc/gdm3 which I think you've already discovered. I haven't tested it, but it appears to be somewhat more targeted than the giant sound ban hammer in the etc/gdm3/greeter.gconf-defaults file.

As for whether the sound is built in, gdm3 is for (surprisingly) gnome 3, which is quickly becoming infamous for lack of configurability. It's a feature you see. Drifting off topic..., but the point is I wouldn't be surprised to find they'd hard-coded a sound file in. As a suggestion though, expand your search for the sound from ogg files to wav files as well.
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby Roaring Silence » 2011-02-17 21:31

Turning the sound off in the gconf-editor changed nothing. All sounds played as before.
It is beginning to look as though the thump sound is built into the file: /usr/sbin/gdm3. I have searched for all .wav and .ogg files in the root folder and none of them sound exactly the same as the initial thump when the login screen appears.
Emariz, Gdm worked well and was more configurable. Why are we going backwards? I hope there is a good reason for the changes.
I can program a sound into the /etc/gdm3/Init/Default script, but that plays way too early, and doesn't cover the thump. I suppose these scripts in /etc/gdm3 are controlled by /usr/sbin/gdm3 ??
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby FreewheelinFrank » 2011-02-17 21:48

If Debianites can come up with a wonderful image like this...

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_8bKHsrsdeQk/S ... esktop.png

they should be able to come up with some pipe music to go with it on boot!
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby oOarthurOo » 2011-02-17 21:59

Roaring Silence wrote:Turning the sound off in the gconf-editor changed nothing. All sounds played as before.

And it wouldn't do anything if you didn't edit gconf key as root making new default as per instructions. Is that what you did?
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby Roaring Silence » 2011-02-18 20:54

There are two gdm settings for sound in the gconf editor:
1) /apps/gdm/simple-greeter/settings-manager/sound - The box there is unticked both for root started gconf-editor and for gconf-editor started by myself as ordinary user.
2) /schemas/apps/gdm/simple-greeter/settings-manager/sound - These keys cannot be altered at the moment.
Am I right in thinking that it is the binary file: /usr/sbin/gdm3 which determines the order in which the scripts in /etc/gdm3/??folder/ are read? There isn't a configuration file anywhere else which references this, is there? I think it is bad that gnome programmers are beginning to do things like building sounds into binaries, because that is what seems to have occurred here. This goes against the whole spirit of Linux. It would be so easy to reference a sound file in /usr/share/sounds called say: "login-ready.ogg" leaving us to swap the sound files around if we wanted to.
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Re: Is there a way of customising events' sounds in Squeeze?

Postby Roaring Silence » 2011-02-25 15:45

I still haven't found a way of stopping the (to me) disagreeable thump when the gdm3 login screen appears. I have, though, still been tinkering with the best way to get start-up and restart/shut-down sounds playing. I thought I would report back on a few refinements I have made that have improved the playing, in case anyone has been following my methods and encountered the problems I did.

1) Start-Up Sounds
I wanted the music to play as soon as Gnome was ready and not before. For some reason /usr/bin/canberra-gtk-play (which only seems to play ogg files) was breaking up the sound as it played the start up music I had chosen to harmonise with my desktop background wallpaper. If it is called in by the libcanberra-login-sound.desktop file in /usr/share/gnome/autostart/ misleadingly named 'GNOME Login Sound', (NB full path: /usr/share/gnome/autostart/libcanberra-login-sound.desktop), it also plays the music too early.
I therefore made the libcanberra-login-sound.desktop file reference a short script 'GnomeStartSound' which I put into /usr/bin/ which introduces a 20 second delay before playing the sound file which I put into /usr/share/sounds/. Further I used a *.wav file, and used aplay instead of canberra-gtk-play to play the sound file. It seems that aplay does not play *.ogg files, but will play *.wav files.
Here is the new libcanberra-gtk-play.desktop file:

Code: Select all
[Desktop Entry]
Type=Application
Name=GNOME Login Sound
Comment=Plays a sound when Gnome is ready
## Exec=/usr/bin/canberra-gtk-play --id="GnomeReadySound" --description="GNOME Login"
Exec=/usr/bin/GnomeStartSound
OnlyShowIn=GNOME;
AutostartCondition=GNOME /desktop/gnome/sound/event_sounds
X-GNOME-Autostart-Phase=Application
X-GNOME-Provides=login-sound


Here is the /usr/bin/GnomeStartSound file:

Code: Select all
#!/bin/sh
## Called by 'GNOME Login Sound' in /usr/share/gnome/autostart/
sleep 20

aplay /usr/share/sounds/GnomeReadySound.wav

sleep 3

exit 0


Please note: if you have Skype installed on your system, and if you have decided to autostart it with each Gnome session, as it loads it will make a grab for the sound server, and the "GnomeReadySound.wav" will not play. This happens regardless of whether you have checked or unchecked the box against "Allow Skype to automatically adjust my mixer levels" in the "Sound Devices" dialogue.


2) Shut-Down Sounds
I found that the exit sounds were playing too quickly. Perhaps this was because alsa is the first process to be killed in /etc/rc0.d/ (the shutdown commands) and /etc/rc6.d/ (the reboot commands) and is pressurising the /etc/gdm3/PostSession/Default script to execute and exit as quickly as possible. The sound was being rushed regardless of the value of "sleep" in the script.
I therefore, as root, renamed the K01alsa-utils link to K07alsa-utils and the K01aumix link to K07aumix in both the /etc/rc0.d/ and the /etc/rc6.d/ folders. Whatever the correctness or otherwise of doing this, it has caused no problems with a smooth shutdown or reboot. It has also solved the problem of the shutdown sounds playing too quickly.
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