What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

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Head_on_a_Stick
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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1161 Post by Head_on_a_Stick »

^ Nice! :D
oswaldkelso wrote:Wallpaper is available under CC-BY-SA
I do hope that's not under v2.0 or v2.5... :mrgreen:

I've installed Alpine Linux on my hard drive now, I love it to bits:

Image

(That's the spacefm file manager and two rxvt-unicode client windows running neofetch and vim open at an APKBUILD for 9base)

systemd is now in a minority when it comes to init systems in our house :|
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ruffwoof
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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1162 Post by ruffwoof »

Pretty much the same as my Debian Jessie ... which looks like

Image

Similar for my FreeBSD and XenialPup64 multi-boots.

All use xorg, jwm, pcmanfm base (with pcmanfm --desktop providing desktop icon support).

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1163 Post by Head_on_a_Stick »

Image

Development version of BunsenLabs Helium booting with OpenRC and the new openrc-init binary, no sysvinit or systemd required :D
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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1164 Post by Nili »

Image
Wallpaper: A port part in TOKYO

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1165 Post by Head_on_a_Stick »

Image
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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1166 Post by Head_on_a_Stick »

Alpine Linux (edge branch) running dwm & slstatus with an rxvt-unicode client window:

Image

Lean.
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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1167 Post by VentGrey »

Alpine Linux (edge branch) running dwm & slstatus with an rxvt-unicode client window:
+10 lynx, I love your wm configs :mrgreen:
I would exchange everything I know in exchange for half of what I don't.

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1168 Post by Head_on_a_Stick »

^ Thanks!

I've added some links for the configs, in case anybody is interested but note that my dwm fork doesn't do xinerama.
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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1169 Post by ruffwoof »

With the recent release of OpenBSD 6.2 I gave it another try. Last time I tried OpenBSD it wasn't much of a success as it didn't work well with nvidia (windows were laggy to drag around), so this time I used the onboard Radeon ATI and its working really well.

(clickable thumbnail)
Image

I opted to use 3 gkrellm's, each set to a relatively small height and positioned them side by side in the top left (disk, cpu, net). I matched the jwm tray height to the same along with matching the colours (my preference is a jwm and pcmanfm --desktop base system). I've set the clock (top left) so that left click acts as show/hide desktop toggle and right mouse click activates MENU. I also added in a borderless/titleless terminal window sized to 60x7 characters that opens below those gkrellm's and that displays/runs htop ... which adds visibility of my CPU's 4 cores (along with some other data/stats). So collectively the desktop is quite animated/active.

Some programs added to the tray i.e. right click of osmo or libre quicklauncher presents dropdown menu for notes/calendar/events and office type choices, other tray buttons directly start programs (firefox, terminal ...etc.). Some icons also put on the desktop for drag/drop operations (e.g. drag a file manager .jpg file to desktop mtpaint program icon opens up mtpaint with that .jpg file ready to be edited).

The basic OpenBSD install was a breeze as was adding packages (pkg_add instead of apt-get). Much nicer than FreeBSD IMO as it more or less all comes pre-configured. Apparently syspatch updates the core system, pkg_add -u updates programs and both worked smoothly (similar to apt-get update, apt-get upgrade). Adding softdep,noatime to each rw ffs filesystem helped improve overall operational speed (switches from being very secure synchronous disk IO to async/buffering ... with considerable speed improvement but foregoes some security/stability (not really a issue for a desktop system, more of a concern for heavily loaded large servers)).

Liking it a lot. Especially having the gkrellm's flashing away as part of the taskbar (still visible when programs are maximised).

Negatives : 6 monthly releases, each release supported for a year, means having to reinstall (upgrade) relatively frequently (6 monthly/1 year), at least if you want to be kept security patched (compared to sticking perhaps for 4 years with a Debian release). Repositories are much more limited ... however personally sufficient to cater for my needs. A lot less usage (at least from a desktop perspective), so google searches tend to result in far fewer associated results than Debian/Linux in general.

I like it a lot, enough to be a keeper, now have it set as my default boot and will stick with that at least for a while (maybe even longer term). I've removed my nvidia card (after the dry summer months I like to dust out the inside of the PC) and it runs really quiet now and when idle CPU usage drops and stays at 0% (runs a lot cooler also).

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1170 Post by Head_on_a_Stick »

ruffwoof wrote:Apparently syspatch updates the core system, pkg_add -u updates programs
Not quite — OpenBSD only supplies third-party binaries for -release (and -current) whereas syspatch(8) upgrades your base system to -stable so then you have to compile your own updated packages from the ports tree.

I would recommend -current for desktop use as it makes maintenance considerably simpler: just boot from /bsd.rd to update to the latest snapshot and use `pkg_add -u` to get the binary updates for third-party packages.

https://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq5.html#Flavors
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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1171 Post by ruffwoof »

Thanks Head_on_a_stick

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1172 Post by RU55EL »

My "little" computer after upgrade from Rasbian 8 to Raspbian9.1 and the 8 GB SD card with a 8 GB USB drive replaced with a 32 GB SD card:

Image

Now seeding Debian 9.2.1 (was seeding 9.2.0)
Last edited by RU55EL on 2017-10-23 21:50, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1173 Post by ruffwoof »

Nice RU55EL

Similar to my recent Debian Stretch 'upgrade' (reinstalled using netinst to upgrade from Jessie) - but I'm not using tmux.

Image

That's a LXDE DE install, with 3 gkrellm's (top left) sized to fit in with the reduced width panel so that 'animated' system activity is still visible when a program is full screen (panel still visible). Menu has been mapped to the clock (left click clock shows the menu), and two undecorated xterms, one to show a htop summary, the other running mc. Mouse over set to sloppy focus (whatever is under the mouse is brought into focus, so quicker/easier to type a command into mc's command line) and the 2 xterms are set to below (so act somewhat like being the wallpaper). xterm's Ctrl left-mouse brings up its menu so for instance the small htop can be maximised to being full screen.

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1174 Post by GarryRicketson »

Recently upgraded OpenBsd to 6.2
Image

Two of the many advantages to OpenBsd that I like is the simple easy
upgrade process and the syspatch feature, that helps keep security patches up-to-date.
The "pkg_add" also is nice, and makes installing packages very simple,straight forward.

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1175 Post by ruffwoof »

GarryRicketson wrote:Recently upgraded OpenBsd to 6.2
Image

Two of the many advantages to OpenBsd that I like is the simple easy
upgrade process and the syspatch feature, that helps keep security patches up-to-date.
The "pkg_add" also is nice, and makes installing packages very simple,straight forward.
Once I dropped nvidia to use the onboard radeon I liked OpenBSD quite a lot. One issue however I had was with installation to a partition. All too easy to have it install to the full disk and lose everything else (I multi-boot) as it does major changes without warning. I gave up with trying to install it to a partition as its disk partition program was too difficult for me in the end (far from intuitive/easy).

Nicer that freebsd IMO if you're more inclined to pre-built packages as pretty much installs configured whereas with freebsd you have to read a lot to figure out the configurations.

Another downside for me was the frequency and potential intensity of upgrades. With Debian its much easier to just stick with older program versions for longer but have security issues patched. OpenBSD is more prone to updates breaking things such as different configuration files being used in later versions of programs such that after a upgrade some things might not work as before and involve further investigation/effort (not so good if primarily you just want a working 'office/end user' type system).

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1176 Post by Head_on_a_Stick »

ruffwoof wrote:One issue however I had was with installation to a partition. All too easy to have it install to the full disk and lose everything else (I multi-boot) as it does major changes without warning. I gave up with trying to install it to a partition as its disk partition program was too difficult for me in the end (far from intuitive/easy).
The trick is to use gdisk (for GPT drives) of fdisk (for msdos drives) to create the OpenBSD disklabel before running the installer — select type a600 in gdisk or type a6 in fdisk — and then use the default option in the partitioning stage to install to that disklabel and leave the rest of the disk alone.
OpenBSD is more prone to updates breaking things such as different configuration files being used in later versions of programs
That will only happen with -current and is quite normal for a rolling-release model.

For -release and -stable, the APIs are guaranteed to be fixed and any patches for -stable will only be applied if they do not necessitate a change to the relevant man page.

Back on topic:

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1177 Post by None1975 »

In OpenBSD, hardware support is terrible. Especially nvidia.
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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1178 Post by ruffwoof »

Head_on_a_Stick wrote:For -release and -stable, the APIs are guaranteed to be fixed and any patches for -stable will only be applied if they do not necessitate a change to the relevant man page.
Worked great thanks. (fdisk to create a a6 and installed to that, now dual booting fine). For -release and just using pre-built packages (pkg_add), what would you suggest in the way of security updates for a basic single user desktop setup. Just run syspatch periodically perhaps and just leave third party programs as-is?

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1179 Post by Head_on_a_Stick »

None1975 wrote:In OpenBSD, hardware support is terrible.
Whilst I would certainly agree that the range of hardware supported under OpenBSD is less than that for GNU/Linux, I would strongly disagree that hardware support per se is anything less than superb — my ThinkPad X201 performs better than under Linux with lower running temperatures and native backlight support, something that was lost to one of Linux's all-too-frequent regressions many years ago :roll:
Especially nvidia.
Well, NVIDIA do not supply their source code (unlike AMD & Intel) so it is not surprising the support in OpenBSD is rather poor, no?

@ruffwoof, use -current for a desktop system and stay on top of the API changes, it becomes just like Arch then ;)

Also, people are expecting screenshots here rather than a discussion so...

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Re: What does your non-Debian desktop look like?

#1180 Post by archimboldo »

Arch linux
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